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Business Education*

BE02: Accounting II
This course provides a broader understanding of the principles learned in Accounting I. The principles are applied to a wider range of business situations including partnerships, corporations, and manufacturing concerns. Students also work with computerized applications more extensively and with federal taxes. This course provides preparation for employment or for advanced study in accounting.
BE03: Financial and Technology Literacy
Students will develop proficiency in the use of the most widely adopted business application, Microsoft Office Suite. This course is designed as an integrated approach to developing competencies in the utilization of MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint to collaborate and communicate in the digital age. Course activities will prepare students for Microsoft Office Specialist Certifications (MOS), which are recommended by the American Council on Education (ACE) for one semester hour of lower division college credit. Additionally, students will develop the knowledge and skills necessary for making informed financial decisions; successfully building, maintaining, and protecting financial resources with particular emphasis on saving, budgeting, investing, and risk management (insurance).
BE07: Computer Programming III
This is an advanced level programming course which will study and apply one or more of the following computer programming languages: Visual Basic, C++, or JAVA. Students will use one of the programming languages to solve a variety of problems confronting contemporary organizations. Students are advised to complete Computer Programming II or consult with their Computer Programming instructor prior to enrolling in Computer Programming III.
BE10: Marketing II
Sales and marketing careers make up one-third of the entire work force in the United States. The Marketing II course provides an organized learning experience in marketing, management, sales and merchandising. This course allows students the opportunity to pursue in greater depth the development of marketing/management competencies necessary for full-time employment and job advancement in marketing and distribution. Students are required to be active in the co-curricular student organization DECA and to be involved in work-based learning experiences.
BE11: E Business
This course is designed to equip students with the technological expertise to be productive employees and entrepreneurs in the management of a small business. Course topics include the step-by-step process of starting, organizing, and managing a business. Topics for students include developing business plans for a service or product line, conducting online research, analyzing and developing websites, and doing a cost analysis. This course involves partnerships with community-based organizations for student work-based learning experiences.
BE16: Principles of Business Management and Entrepreneurship
This is one of two foundation courses required for all pathways in the Business Management and Finance Career Cluster and is essential to all pathways. This course provides a foundational understanding of the role of business in a global society, American business as a dynamic process, forms of business ownership, management concepts, marketing, production and distribution, and accounting and finance. Along with a brief historical perspective, business terminology and principles will be emphasized. Students will develop the communication skills that will be necessary for success in the workplace and college while understanding the business world and preparing to meet their career goals and objectives.
BE32: Principles of Accounting/Managerial Accounting AOF
Principles of Accounting provide students with the knowledge that accounting is a process of providing data and information that serves internal and external stakeholders. The second half of this course introduces the fundamentals of management accounting, including manufacturing and cost accounting, budgeting, accounting for managerial decision-making, and fnancial statement analysis. Students learn how to use accounting information for internal decsion-making and planning and control. Students also examine career opportunities and the professional certifications and designations earned by individuals in the accounting profession.
BE40: Principles of Accounting and Finance
This is one of two foundation courses required for all pathways in the Business Management and Finance Career Cluster and is essential to all pathways. This course provides a foundational understanding of the role of business in a global society, American business as a dynamic process, forms of business ownership, management concepts, marketing, production and distribution, and accounting and finance. Along with a brief historical perspective, business terminology and principles will be emphasized. Students will develop the communication skills that will be necessary for success in the workplace and college while understanding the business world and preparing to meet their career goals and objectives.
BE41: Advanced Accounting
This course is designed to be the second of two sequential accounting courses of the completer requirement for students enrolled in the Financing and Accounting Pathway. This course provides students with accounting knowledge that will prepare them for post-high school levels of education and entry-level positions in the workforce. Focus will be on accounting procedures necessary to address long and short-term assets and investments, long and short-term liabilities, inventory management and accounting ratios used in the decision-making process. A comprehensive study of the accounting procedures used in establishing corporations, declaring and paying dividends, the formation and dissolution of partnerships, distribution of net income and owners’ equity statements is included in this course. Career paths for accounting will be examined and the use of accounting knowledge in a variety of career clusters is also explored. Awareness of ethical issues and application of ethical decision-making models will be reinforced throughout the course.
BE42: Advanced Business Management
This course is designed to be the second of two sequential Business Management courses of the completer requirement for students enrolled in the Business Management pathway. This course provides students with the knowledge that will prepare them for post-high school levels of education and entry-level positions in the workforce. Focus will be on the role of business in society, the changing nature of contemporary business practice, major management concepts and theories, the processes of management (functional, operational, human relations), business law and ethics, and business communications. Career paths will be examined and the use of business management knowledge in a variety of career clusters is also explored. Awareness of ethical issues and application of ethical decision-making models will be reinforced throughout the course.
BE43: Introduction to Marketing
The Introduction to Marketing course introduces students to the essential concepts of marketing theory and the foundations, functions and benefits of marketing in a free enterprise system.  Marketing requires a skilled, professional understanding of consumer behavior and economic trends in order to gain a competitive advantage in today’s global marketplace. Throughout the Introduction to Marketing course, students will use and incorporate technologies to conduct research and communicate. Students will integrate their knowledge of legal issues, the importance of ethics, and social responsibilities in marketing. Students will understand and demonstrate strong interpersonal skills and develop an appreciation of human diversity.  By the end of Introduction to Marketing, students will have a solid understanding of the many diverse career opportunities in the field of marketing.
BE44: Advanced Marketing
This course is designed to be the second of two sequential marketing courses of the completer requirement for students enrolled in the Marketing Program of Study. The Advanced course builds on the concepts studied in Introduction to Marketing by giving students in-depth, comprehensive project-based learning opportunities. Students will apply their understanding of consumer buying behavior and relationships, the tools and techniques used by organizations that identify the factors that influence marketing strategy decisions, market segmentation and target marketing, and other considerations in order to create a written professional marketing plan. Throughout the course, students will use strong interpersonal skills and incorporate technologies when conducting primary and secondary research. Students will integrate their knowledge of legal issues, ethics, diversity and social responsibilities in developing their marketing plan. Students will continue to explore the many diverse career opportunities in the field of marketing.
BE45: Business and Entrepreneurship Capstone/Dual Enrollment
Students will apply the knowledge and skills acquired in previous business pathway courses through the completion of a final capstone project.  The capstone project is a personally-designed, independently conducted activity which will enable the student to further their knowledge/skills in an approved end-of-course final project.  The capstone project will involve intense problem-solving in their chosen business pathway and offer the student the opportunity to think critically about a subject of profound interest to them.  An alternative to the final capstone project will be an online dual enrollment option through Harford Community College where the student will complete six credits in approved business courses between the Fall and Spring semesters. These courses will be taken at the student's high school and faciliatted by a high school teacher. 

 

Career Research and Development

CT67: Maryland Fire And Rescue Institute Program
This program is a joint venture between the Harford County Public Schools, the Association of Volunteer Fire and Emergency Medical Services of Harford County and the Maryland Fire and Rescue Institute of Maryland (MFRI). This one-year program provides (a) state certification in the area of fire, rescue, and emergency medical skills and techniques, and (b) a Career and Technology Education program completer status for registered students. Individuals electing this program must register in the Career Research and Development Program and receive one credit for the first course. Upon completion of the program, students will receive four credits, and will be Career and Technology Education (CTE) program completers and receive articulated credits through the University of Maryland at College Park. The program will encompass one full year of half days.
CT85: Career Research And Development
Students taking this course will begin researching careers and will take a variety of career and interest assessments. Students will begin to develop a portfolio demonstrating workplace and academic readiness. Students will learn how to effectively plan for their future incorporating both employment, education and training goals, begin developing financial literacy skills, and integrate the Maryland’s Skills for Success as they begin to manage their career choices and educational choices.
CT86: Career Development Preparation And Transition
The overall goal of this course is to have students apply the knowledge gained in the first course to the practical experience of their work-based learning placement.  Students will continue building a career portfolio that demonstrates proficiencies in workplace readiness, personal financial management, personal growth and development, and employment experiences.  Students will learn to plan effectively for their future incorporating employment, education and training goals, building financial literacy skills, and integrating the Maryland’s Skills for Success as they begin to manage their career and educational choices. An alternative to the Career Development, Preparation and Transition course will be a dual enrollment option through Harford Community College SDEV103- Career and Life Planning.
CT87: Work Based Learning Experience
The Work-Based Learning Coordinator will coach and assist students as they secure employment based on the results from career research, interest inventories, and aptitude assessments taken in the Career Research and Development course and the Career Development, Preparation, and Transition. This workplace component is mentored, on-the-job training enables students to receive the knowledge, skills, and appropriate attitudes needed to be successful in today’s workplace.

 

English

EN01W: Honors English I
This course follows the same structure as English I with some variation in course content to allow for an accelerated pace and an advanced study of appropriately complex text. Honors English I incorporates additional writing opportunities for students to refine and strengthen their writing skills to an advanced level. Students are expected to manage independent work, collaborate with others, and fully participate in student generated discussions and research. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN01: English I
The ninth grade English curriculum is the beginning of a four-year sequential program. Ninth grade students will read a variety of texts arranged thematically and write in a variety of forms including argument, informational, and narrative. Language and speaking and listening skills are integrated in both reading and writing. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN02W: Honors English II
This course follows the same structure as English II with some variation in course content to allow for an accelerated pace and an advanced study of appropriately complex text. Students will engage in an in-depth analysis of texts. Focus is given to writing that aligns to future English Advanced Placement courses. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN02: English II
Building on the fundamental concepts taught in ninth grade, the tenth grade English curriculum will further assist students in developing a global awareness. Tenth grade students will build upon the integration of reading, writing, speaking and listening while strengthening language usage. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN03: English III
Eleventh grade students will continue to develop techniques of discussion and written expression through critical reading of American writers with emphasis on an analysis of the interrelationships of culture and literature. Students will write with sophistication in a variety of forms. Students will demonstrate their college and career readiness by independently showing increased proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN03: HCC English 101
Eleventh grade students will continue to develop techniques of discussion and written expression through critical reading of American writers with emphasis on an analysis of the interrelationships of culture and literature. Students will write with sophistication in a variety of forms. Students will demonstrate their college and career readiness by independently showing increased proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN03: HCC English 206
Eleventh grade students will continue to develop techniques of discussion and written expression through critical reading of American writers with emphasis on an analysis of the interrelationships of culture and literature. Students will write with sophistication in a variety of forms. Students will demonstrate their college and career readiness by independently showing increased proficiency in reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN04: English IV British Literature
The twelfth grade English curriculum is the culmination of the students’ study of language, literature, and writing in high school. The thematic curriculum uses works of British literature to refine skills in critical reading, literary analysis, and written expression. Students will participate in civil, democratic discussions around topics related to their reading and writing. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN04: HCC English 102
The twelfth grade English curriculum is the culmination of the students’ study of language, literature, and writing in high school. The thematic curriculum uses works of British literature to refine skills in critical reading, literary analysis, and written expression. Students will participate in civil, democratic discussions around topics related to their reading and writing. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN04: HCC English 204
The twelfth grade English curriculum is the culmination of the students’ study of language, literature, and writing in high school. The thematic curriculum uses works of British literature to refine skills in critical reading, literary analysis, and written expression. Students will participate in civil, democratic discussions around topics related to their reading and writing. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN05: AP English Language And Composition
This college level course is designed for juniors. Rigorous training in college-level composition skills and literary analysis is provided. The literature will also be used as the foundation for instruction and practice in various types of exposition and systematic instruction in college-level grammar and usage. The course is designed to prepare students to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN06: AP English Literature Composition
This college level course focuses on selected classic and modern novels, poetry, and general non-fiction. It is designed for seniors who have ability in and motivation toward the study of literature. This course provides rigorous training in literary analysis. Students will discuss and assess literary qualities and ideas, trends, and techniques. Types of exposition will be reviewed and practiced. This course is designed to prepare students to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
EN07: Journalism I
This course provides the student with an opportunity to learn and apply the principles of writing for publications. In addition to news writing, students study production techniques and management, public relations, typography, lay-out formats, and photographic concepts. Students will be introduced to the technology of publication.
EN08: Journalism II
This course expands the knowledge of journalistic principles and techniques developed in Journalism I. Students in this course assist in publishing the school newspaper each month and in preparing weekly press releases to local media. Students will continue in their development of technological skills in publication.
EN09: Journalism III
This course enables students to assist in the publishing of the school newspaper. They will also learn to interview both adults and students, to contact the public to meet deadlines, and to work cooperatively. Students will make use of and develop expertise in the technology of publication through the use of advanced computer technology for the production of the newspaper.
EN11: Speech Communications
This course helps give students the skills needed to be successful communicators in the many different personal, social, and professional situations they may experience in life. The first half of the course concentrates on oral communication, physical communication, and listening skills in intrapersonal, interpersonal, and group discussions. The second half of the course concentrates on public speaking. Instruction emphasizes research and organization of information, awareness of audience, personal poise, language style, and critique.
EN15: Creative Writing I
This course offers practice and guidance in creative writing and evaluation of the student's work. Students practice a wide variety of written forms. Journals of thoughts and observations are kept throughout the year. As expertise increases, students plan, produce, and revise their own writing projects. Students may be involved in the production and layout of the school literary magazine.
EN16: Creative Writing II
This course offers an opportunity for further development of the student’s work. Students experiment with an advanced variety of forms, styles, and techniques. Students will develop individualized methods of generating, recording, and assessing writing ideas and resources. Students will be responsible for maintaining a writers’ community and pursuing professional development endeavors. Students will work independently to plan, produce, revise, and publish their own writing projects and pursue professional publication. Students may be involved in the production and layout of the school literary magazine.
EN17: Creative Writing III
This course expands the knowledge of writing skills and techniques developed in Creative Writing II.
EN19: Humanities
This course encompasses art, music, theatre, literature, and philosophy. Each area receives emphasis as a separate discipline, but interrelationships between disciplines are explored throughout the course. A creative project by each student is among the requirements for this course.
EN20: Women In Perspective
This course focuses on women in literature. Through the study of literature, students will examine and discuss such topics as the origin of sexual stereotypes, changing roles of women in society, and different cultural expectations of women. This course will provide an in-depth study of literature and will require application, analysis, synthesis and evaluation by the student.
EN29: English IV For The 21st Century
This course is designed to prepare students for the introductory year of college English and for the writing demands of the workplace.  Writing, reading, critical thinking, and discussion are the key components of the class that focuses on rhetorical analysis.  Contemporary fiction and non-fiction selections will provide the springboard for discussions and originals essays in a variety of rhetorical modes. Successful completion of this course earns one required English credit.
SE34: Corrective Reading I
Corrective Reading I is a research-based reading intervention designed to accelerate reading proficiency with explicit, sequential, and systematic instruction through the use of Direct Instruction. This program is intended for students reading four or more years below grade level. Since the best results have been found with two years of this intensive intervention, students in Corrective Reading I will be registered for Corrective Reading II the following year.
SE35: Corrective Reading II
Corrective Reading II is the continuation of the intensive reading intervention students began with Corrective Reading.

 

Fine Arts

AR01: Art Appreciation
This course provides for the exploration of media and techniques in drawing, painting, three-dimensional design, and visual communications. Emphasis is placed on the relationship of the art elements and design principles to forms of expression, historical periods, styles, and artists. Upon completion of this course, students should have a working art vocabulary, a general knowledge of art history and contemporary trends, as well as a greater understanding and appreciation of art in their society. This course is intended for students who wish only to fulfill their Fine Arts graduation requirement and not pursue further courses of study in art. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR02: Fine Art Preparation
This course is a basic foundation course that allows for exploration of historical and cultural art trends, as well as skill development in drawing, painting, three-dimensional design, and visual communications. The art elements and principles of design are applied to compositions and processes involving a variety of media. Upon completion of this course, the student should demonstrate competency in handling drawing, painting, and sculptural media and be prepared for further study in upper level art courses. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR03: Crafts
This course focuses on the study of the applied arts, artistic objects with functional purposes. This includes, but is not limited to, ceramics, stained glass, mosaics, jewelry, fiber arts, batik, bookmaking, and metal works. The evolution of crafts is explored historically and culturally. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR04: Drawing And Painting
This course focuses on the practices and applications of basic drawing and painting principles and techniques. Various media and composition applications will be explored in studio assignments. Upon completion of this course, the student should demonstrate proficiency with different media and in the utilization of the principles of design in compositions. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR05: Advanced Drawing
This course provides an in-depth concentration and application of drawing processes and composition problems. Exploring creative problem solving and developing personal imagery are approached through mastery of drawing media, techniques, and assignments. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR06: Advanced Painting
This course provides an in-depth concentration and application of painting processes and composition problems. Exploring creative problem solving, color theory, and developing personal imagery are approached through mastery of painting media, techniques, and assignments. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR07: Printmaking
This course emphasizes printmaking processes that are used for personal expression and commercial applications. The historical and cultural implications of printmaking are explored in a variety of processes. The basic techniques include stencil, silk screen, relief, monotype, and lithography. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR08: Photography
This course provides instruction in the utilization of photography as a means of communication and expression. The historical and cultural context of photography is also explored. Camera use, darkroom procedures and technology, picture selection, and composition are emphasized. Students must have use of a 35 mm camera and will be required to pay for film and developing expenses. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required. Note: Students who successful complete this course in a traditional darkroom experience may earn articulated credit at HCC. Not all schools offer the traditional darkroom experience. See your Art teacher for further information.
AR09: Advanced Studio Drawing
This course is designed for the advanced art student who is capable of an intense individualized program of instruction. Students will be using problem solving processes in response to various conceptual and creative challenges. Development of a portfolio based on the evaluation of personal work and career exploration will be included in the program of instruction. Media may include, but not be limited to, graphite, charcoal, ink, conte, pastel, marker, and dry point. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR10: Advanced Studio Painting
This course is designed for the advanced art student who is capable of an intense individualized program of instruction. Students will be using problem solving processes in response to various conceptual and creative challenges. Development of a portfolio based on the evaluation of personal work and career exploration will be included in the program of instruction. Media may include, but not be limited to, tempera, acrylic, watercolor, pastel, ink, oil paint, and gouache. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR11: Advanced Studio Three Dimensional Design
This course provides an in-depth concentration and application of sculpture processes and composition problems. Exploring creative problem solving and developing personal imagery are approached through mastery of sculpture media, techniques, and assignments. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR12: Advanced Studio Visual Communications
This course is designed for the advanced art student who is capable of an intense individualized program of instruction. Students will be using the problem solving processes in response to various conceptual and creative challenges. Development of a portfolio based on the evaluation of personal work and career exploration will be included in the program of instruction. Media may include, but not limited to, graphite, charcoal, ink, conte, pastel, marker, watercolor, acrylic, oil paints, computer editing, paint or digital manipulation software. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR13: AP Studio Art Drawing
These are college level courses that are designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. AP Studio Art courses are not based on a written exam; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year in one of three areas: Drawing, 2D Design or 3D Design. The Drawing Portfolio is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing issues and media. Light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, and illusion of depth and mark-making are drawing issues than can be addressed through a variety of means. The 2D Design Portfolio is intended to address two-dimensional design issues through any two-dimensional medium or process, including, but not limited to, graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, illustration, painting, and printmaking. The 3D Design Portfolio is intended to address sculptural issues through any three-dimensional approach, including, but not limited to, figurative or non-figurative sculpture, architectural models, metal work, ceramics, three dimensional fiber arts, fashion, jewelry and body adornments, and time-based media.
AR14: Three Dimensional Design
This course involves the study of a variety of sculptural forms and processes historically and culturally. A wide range of organic and inorganic media will be used to transition two-dimensional ideas and concepts into three-dimensional forms. The techniques include, but are not limited to, relief, freestanding, carving, casting, molding, and construction. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR15: Advanced Three Dimensional Design
This course provides an in-depth concentration and application of sculpture processes and composition problems. Exploring creative problem solving and developing personal imagery are approached through mastery of sculpture media, techniques, and assignments. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR16: AP Art History
This course is a college level course designed to provide students with an understanding and knowledge of architecture, sculpture, painting, and other art forms within diverse historical and cultural contexts. Students will examine and critically analyze major forms of artistic expression from the past and the present from a variety of cultures and consider such issues as patronage, gender, and the functions and effects of works of art. Students may take the College Board Advanced Placement Test at the completion of this course. Note: This course does not meet the Fine Arts requirement for graduation; all other art courses meet the Fine Arts requirement for graduation.
AR17: Visual Communications
Visual Communications builds on the basic knowledge acquired in drawing and painting to solve contemporary graphic design problems. Emphasis is placed on the conception, creation, and implementation of visual solutions to complex problems. Techniques and processes may include illustration, printmaking, digital imaging, multi-media, typography, and video. Students will be able to explore a variety of career areas using media specific to each. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR22: AP Studio Art 2D Design
These are college level courses that are designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. AP Studio Art courses are not based on a written exam; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year in one of three areas: Drawing, 2D Design or 3D Design. The Drawing Portfolio is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing issues and media. Light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, and illusion of depth and mark-making are drawing issues than can be addressed through a variety of means. The 2D Design Portfolio is intended to address two-dimensional design issues through any two-dimensional medium or process, including, but not limited to, graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, illustration, painting, and printmaking. The 3D Design Portfolio is intended to address sculptural issues through any three-dimensional approach, including, but not limited to, figurative or non-figurative sculpture, architectural models, metal work, ceramics, three dimensional fiber arts, fashion, jewelry and body adornments, and time-based media.
AR24: Advanced Photography
Advanced Photography provides an in-depth concentration and application of traditional photographic techniques. Students will move away from the traditional darkroom into alternative photographic processes and into the digital realm of image manipulation. Development of a portfolio based on the evaluation of personal work and career exploration will be included in the program of instruction. Students must have use of a 35mm camera and will be required to pay for film and developing expenses. Home assignments and a sketchbook are required.
AR25: AP Studio Art 3D Design
These are college level courses that are designed for students who are seriously interested in the practical experience of art. AP Studio Art courses are not based on a written exam; instead, students submit portfolios for evaluation at the end of the school year in one of three areas: Drawing, 2D Design or 3D Design. The Drawing Portfolio is designed to address a very broad interpretation of drawing issues and media. Light and shade, line quality, rendering of form, composition, surface manipulation, and illusion of depth and mark-making are drawing issues than can be addressed through a variety of means. The 2D Design Portfolio is intended to address two-dimensional design issues through any two-dimensional medium or process, including, but not limited to, graphic design, digital imaging, photography, collage, fabric design, weaving, fashion design, illustration, painting, and printmaking. The 3D Design Portfolio is intended to address sculptural issues through any three-dimensional approach, including, but not limited to, figurative or non-figurative sculpture, architectural models, metal work, ceramics, three dimensional fiber arts, fashion, jewelry and body adornments, and time-based media.
DA18: Dance I
This course is an introductory movement course in the fundamentals of ballet, modern, and jazz dance. Each unit of study includes dance technique, history, and heath and injury prevention with further study of cultural and social dance forms. Students will have written/reading assignments, in-class evaluations, and a final exam. There are two required performances in the winter and spring dance concerts. No previous experience is necessary. This course meets the Fine Arts requirement for graduation.
DA19: Dance II
This course is offered to students who have successfully completed Dance I or by audition. Units of study include ballet, modern, and jazz techniques with further instruction in cultural and social forms, history, anatomy, improvisation, and composition. Students will have written/reading assignments, in-class evaluations, and a final exam. There are two required performances in a dance concert.
DA20: Dance III
This course continues the work in ballet, modern, jazz, tap, and hip hop techniques. Students will continue to focus on the development of performance skills. Anatomy, dance history, improvisation, and composition will enrich the course of study. Students will choreograph, teach, and perform original works from a variety of genres. Students will have written/reading assignments, in-class evaluations, a midterm, and a final exam. There are two required performances in a dance concert. Admission to the course is by audition or successful completion of Dance II.
DA21: Dance IV
This course is an intermediate/advanced course offered to students interested in progressing to an advanced level and gaining more performance experiences. Further development in ballet, modern, jazz, and historical, cultural, social forms is correlated with a concentration on performance. Students will continue to have written/reading assignments, in-class evaluations, student/teacher assessments, a midterm, and final exam. Admission to this course is by audition or successful completion of Dance III. Students will perform throughout the year.
DA23: Dance Company Level I
This course is an advanced performance course offered to students in grades 10-12 who have been accepted through an audition. Advanced development in ballet, modern, and jazz correlate with a concentration on performance. Historical, cultural, and social dance forms will be included in history and criticism activities. Interdisciplinary work will be included in student projects. Students will continue to have written/reading assignments, in-class student and teacher evaluations, a midterm, and final exam. Weekly, evening rehearsals are required to prepare for upcoming concerts/assemblies. The performance group will perform in a variety of settings throughout the year that will require extra-curricular dedication from the student. There are three required performances in the winter, spring, and seminar dance concerts. Students may take this course more than one time.
DA26: Dance Company Level II
This course is an advanced performance course offered to students in grades 10-12 who have been accepted through an audition. Advanced development in ballet, modern, and jazz correlate with a concentration on performance. Historical, cultural, and social dance forms will be included in history and criticism activities. Interdisciplinary work will be included in student projects. Students will continue to have written/reading assignments, in-class student and teacher evaluations, a midterm, and final exam. Weekly, evening rehearsals are required to prepare for upcoming concerts/assemblies. The performance group will perform in a variety of settings throughout the year that will require extra-curricular dedication from the student. There are three required performances in the winter, spring, and seminar dance concerts. Students may take this course more than one time.
DA27: Dance Company Level III
This course is an advanced performance course offered to students in grades 10-12 who have been accepted through an audition. Advanced development in ballet, modern, and jazz correlate with a concentration on performance. Historical, cultural, and social dance forms will be included in history and criticism activities. Interdisciplinary work will be included in student projects. Students will continue to have written/reading assignments, in-class student and teacher evaluations, a midterm, and final exam. Weekly, evening rehearsals are required to prepare for upcoming concerts/assemblies. The performance group will perform in a variety of settings throughout the year that will require extra-curricular dedication from the student. There are three required performances in the winter, spring, and seminar dance concerts. Students may take this course more than one time.
DA28: Dance Company Level IV
This course is an advanced performance course offered to students in grades 10-12 who have been accepted through an audition. Advanced development in ballet, modern, and jazz correlate with a concentration on performance. Historical, cultural, and social dance forms will be included in history and criticism activities. Interdisciplinary work will be included in student projects. Students will continue to have written/reading assignments, in-class student and teacher evaluations, a midterm, and final exam. Weekly, evening rehearsals are required to prepare for upcoming concerts/assemblies. The performance group will perform in a variety of settings throughout the year that will require extra-curricular dedication from the student. There are three required performances in the winter, spring, and seminar dance concerts. Students may take this course more than one time.
DR12: Drama I
This course explores the various areas of dramatics in order to give an understanding and appreciation of the art form. Students will participate in pantomime, improvisation, directing, acting, and technical theater.
DR13: Drama II
This course provides serious drama students with an opportunity to apply their drama skills and to further their drama experience. Students will select and produce plays. Each student will have an opportunity to participate as an actor, director, and production worker.
DR14: Drama III
This course expands the knowledge of drama skills and techniques developed in Drama II.
MU01: Chorus I
This course develops and refines fundamental vocal techniques including correct breathing, proper tone placement, and pure vowel pronunciation. Achievement of desired choral blend and balance of parts through application of proper singing skills is stressed. Skills in score reading are developed through rehearsal of music literature representative of a diversity of styles. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU02: Chorus II
This course develops and refines fundamental vocal techniques including correct breathing, proper tone placement, and pure vowel pronunciation. Achievement of desired choral blend and balance of parts through application of proper singing skills is stressed. Skills in score reading are developed through rehearsal of music literature representative of a diversity of styles. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU03: A Cappella Choir I
This course provides the opportunity to perform a wide variety of predominately a cappella literature of all periods and styles. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU04: Mens Chorus
This course is designed for those male students who have a genuine interest in learning more about proper voice production, music reading, and choral singing. The selection of music will be varied in style and period. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU04: Mens Chorus l
This course is designed for those male students who have a genuine interest in learning more about proper voice production, music reading, and choral singing. The selection of music will be varied in style and period. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU05: Advanced Chorus l
This course emphasizes development of advanced vocal and choral skills and adds the performance of selected standard literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU06: Women Chorus I
This course is designed for those female students who have a genuine interest in learning more about proper voice production, music reading, and choral singing. The selection of music will be varied in style and period. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU07: Band I
This course continues to develop instrumental skills and to increase knowledge of fundamentals of music. Band rehearses and performs all types and styles of band literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU09: Concert Band l
This course continues to develop instrumental skills and to increase knowledge of fundamentals of music. Concert band rehearses and performs all types and styles of band literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU10: Orchestra I
This course enhances instrumental skills and knowledge of music fundamentals by rehearsing and performing a wide variety of orchestral literature. The student gains proficiency in the techniques of orchestral, ensemble, and solo performance. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU11: Beginning Piano
This course is designed to allow the student to develop music reading skills and keyboard techniques at his or her own pace. It includes classroom instruction and individual and ensemble lab practice.
MU12: Advanced Piano
This self-paced program continues at each student's level of achievement and includes classroom instruction and lab practice.
MU13: Guitar Lab
This course provides the student an opportunity to learn basic guitar skills and techniques. The student will study various styles of music for the guitar.
MU14: Guitar Ensemble I
This course is open to students with previous experience in playing classical guitar. The emphasis is on performance and ensemble playing. Students play duets, trios, and quartets with other class members. Popular music using choral and melodic accompaniment is taught. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU15: Chamber Music l
This course is designed for the serious string, woodwind, or brass instrumental music student who desires advanced performance experience. It emphasizes expansion of knowledge and playing proficiency through in-depth study of chamber music literature. Concentration is on analysis of form and utilization of techniques and styles characteristic of the various period of music history. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU16: Percussion Ensemble I
This course is designed for those students who wish to develop and improve their percussion instrument skills. Students are expected to learn to play various percussion instruments, to repair and maintain instruments properly, and to rehearse percussion music of various styles. The percussion ensemble serves as the percussion section of the concert band. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU17: Voice
This course is designed for the student who is interested in developing his or her voice through serious vocal study. A variety of literature and specific problems of vocal technique are discussed and analyzed.
MU18: American Music In The Theater And Film
This course is an overview of the development of American musical theater and music in films. Concentration is placed on European theater, the end of the silent film era, the American musical stage, and modern motion picture scoring. This class does not meet the Fine Arts requirement for graduation.
MU19: Music For Listening
This course is designed to acquaint students with the instrumental, vocal, and keyboard literature of the medieval period through the twentieth century. Critical thinking will be utilized to assist students to develop precise listening skills and appreciation for the affect of music on man and his culture. This class does not meet the Fine Arts requirement for graduation.
MU20: Survey Of Twentieth Century Popular Music
This course will trace the history of twentieth-century popular music and show its relationship to American cultural development. Musical styles covered in this survey will be folk music, jazz, musical theatre, and rock and roll. Throughout the survey, development of listening skills will be emphasized. This class does not meet the Fine Arts requirement for graduation.
MU21: Music Theory
In this course, the music student will learn concepts in music theory including detailed study and analysis.  It offers structured work in ear training, harmony, sight singing, and melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation.
MU22: Symphonic Band l
This course enhances instrumental skills and knowledge of music fundamentals by rehearsing and performing a wide variety of music. The student gains proficiency in techniques of ensemble and solo performance. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU24: Jazz Ensemble I
This course is designed to teach the basic skills of jazz improvisation and ensemble performance. It is open to all instrumental students who possess at least average performance ability on their instrument. A variety of music is played, and time is devoted to listening to recordings of outstanding jazz artists and jazz bands. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU25: Band II
This course continues to develop instrumental skills and to increase knowledge of fundamentals of music. Band rehearses and performs all types and styles of band literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU26: Madrigal Choir l
This course is a selective chamber ensemble made up of 8-16 students in grades 9-12. The course emphasizes the study of various styles of a cappella singing including: Madrigals, Vocal Jazz, Folk and Art Song arrangements and other classical genres. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU28: AP Music Theory
In this course, the serious music student will learn advanced concepts in music theory including detailed study and analysis.  It offers structured work in ear training, harmony, sight singing, and melodic, rhythmic and harmonic dictation.
MU29: Orchestra II
This course enhances instrumental skills and knowledge of music fundamentals by rehearsing and performing a wide variety of orchestral literature. The student gains proficiency in the techniques of orchestral, ensemble, and solo performance. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU30: Orchestra III
This course enhances instrumental skills and knowledge of music fundamentals by rehearsing and performing a wide variety of orchestral literature. The student gains proficiency in the techniques of orchestral, ensemble, and solo performance. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU31: Orchestra IV
This course enhances instrumental skills and knowledge of music fundamentals by rehearsing and performing a wide variety of orchestral literature. The student gains proficiency in the techniques of orchestral, ensemble, and solo performance. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU32: Guitar Ensemble II
This course is open to students with previous experience in playing classical guitar. The emphasis is on performance and ensemble playing. Students play duets, trios, and quartets with other class members. Popular music using choral and melodic accompaniment is taught. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU33: Guitar Ensemble III
This course is open to students with previous experience in playing classical guitar. The emphasis is on performance and ensemble playing. Students play duets, trios, and quartets with other class members. Popular music using choral and melodic accompaniment is taught. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU34: Jazz Ensemble II
This course is designed to teach the basic skills of jazz improvisation and ensemble performance. It is open to all instrumental students who possess at least average performance ability on their instrument. A variety of music is played, and time is devoted to listening to recordings of outstanding jazz artists and jazz bands. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU35: Jazz Ensemble III
This course is designed to teach the basic skills of jazz improvisation and ensemble performance. It is open to all instrumental students who possess at least average performance ability on their instrument. A variety of music is played, and time is devoted to listening to recordings of outstanding jazz artists and jazz bands. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU36: Jazz Ensemble IV
This course is designed to teach the basic skills of jazz improvisation and ensemble performance. It is open to all instrumental students who possess at least average performance ability on their instrument. A variety of music is played, and time is devoted to listening to recordings of outstanding jazz artists and jazz bands. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU37: Percussion Ensemble II
This course is designed for those students who wish to develop and improve their percussion instrument skills. Students are expected to learn to play various percussion instruments, to repair and maintain instruments properly, and to rehearse percussion music of various styles. The percussion ensemble serves as the percussion section of the concert band. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU38: Percussion Ensemble III
This course is designed for those students who wish to develop and improve their percussion instrument skills. Students are expected to learn to play various percussion instruments, to repair and maintain instruments properly, and to rehearse percussion music of various styles. The percussion ensemble serves as the percussion section of the concert band. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU39: Percussion Ensemble IV
This course is designed for those students who wish to develop and improve their percussion instrument skills. Students are expected to learn to play various percussion instruments, to repair and maintain instruments properly, and to rehearse percussion music of various styles. The percussion ensemble serves as the percussion section of the concert band. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU42: Concert Band II
This course continues to develop instrumental skills and to increase knowledge of fundamentals of music. Concert band rehearses and performs all types and styles of band literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU43: Concert Band III
This course continues to develop instrumental skills and to increase knowledge of fundamentals of music. Concert band rehearses and performs all types and styles of band literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU44: Concert Band IV
This course continues to develop instrumental skills and to increase knowledge of fundamentals of music. Concert band rehearses and performs all types and styles of band literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU45: Chamber Music II
This course is designed for the serious string, woodwind, or brass instrumental music student who desires advanced performance experience. It emphasizes expansion of knowledge and playing proficiency through in-depth study of chamber music literature. Concentration is on analysis of form and utilization of techniques and styles characteristic of the various period of music history. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU46: Chamber Music III
This course is designed for the serious string, woodwind, or brass instrumental music student who desires advanced performance experience. It emphasizes expansion of knowledge and playing proficiency through in-depth study of chamber music literature. Concentration is on analysis of form and utilization of techniques and styles characteristic of the various period of music history. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU47: Chamber Music IV
This course is designed for the serious string, woodwind, or brass instrumental music student who desires advanced performance experience. It emphasizes expansion of knowledge and playing proficiency through in-depth study of chamber music literature. Concentration is on analysis of form and utilization of techniques and styles characteristic of the various period of music history. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU48: Symphonic Band II
This course enhances instrumental skills and knowledge of music fundamentals by rehearsing and performing a wide variety of music. The student gains proficiency in techniques of ensemble and solo performance. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU49: Symphonic Band III
This course enhances instrumental skills and knowledge of music fundamentals by rehearsing and performing a wide variety of music. The student gains proficiency in techniques of ensemble and solo performance. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU50: Symphonic Band IV
This course enhances instrumental skills and knowledge of music fundamentals by rehearsing and performing a wide variety of music. The student gains proficiency in techniques of ensemble and solo performance. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU51: Madrigal Choir II
This course is a selective chamber ensemble made up of 8-16 students in grades 9-12. The course emphasizes the study of various styles of a cappella singing including: Madrigals, Vocal Jazz, Folk and Art Song arrangements and other classical genres. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU52: Madrigal Choir III
This course is a selective chamber ensemble made up of 8-16 students in grades 9-12. The course emphasizes the study of various styles of a cappella singing including: Madrigals, Vocal Jazz, Folk and Art Song arrangements and other classical genres. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU55: A Cappella Choir II
This course provides the opportunity to perform a wide variety of predominately a cappella literature of all periods and styles. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU56: A Cappella Choir III
This course provides the opportunity to perform a wide variety of predominately a cappella literature of all periods and styles. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU57: Mens Chorus II
This course is designed for those male students who have a genuine interest in learning more about proper voice production, music reading, and choral singing. The selection of music will be varied in style and period. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU58: Mens Chorus III
This course is designed for those male students who have a genuine interest in learning more about proper voice production, music reading, and choral singing. The selection of music will be varied in style and period. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU59: Mens Chorus IV
This course is designed for those male students who have a genuine interest in learning more about proper voice production, music reading, and choral singing. The selection of music will be varied in style and period. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU60: Womens Chorus II
This course is designed for those female students who have a genuine interest in learning more about proper voice production, music reading, and choral singing. The selection of music will be varied in style and period. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU61: Womens Chorus III
This course is designed for those female students who have a genuine interest in learning more about proper voice production, music reading, and choral singing. The selection of music will be varied in style and period. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU62: Womens Chorus IV
This course is designed for those female students who have a genuine interest in learning more about proper voice production, music reading, and choral singing. The selection of music will be varied in style and period. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU63: Advanced Chorus II
This course emphasizes development of advanced vocal and choral skills and adds the performance of selected standard literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU64: Advanced Chorus III
This course emphasizes development of advanced vocal and choral skills and adds the performance of selected standard literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU65: Music Technology I
This course is for the advanced music student or one who has a strong background in computer technology. Students will utilize music composition, audio production, and video editing software to create projects. Students will be encouraged to be creative and must be able to work in small groups as well as individually.
MU66: A Cappella Choir IV
This course provides the opportunity to perform a wide variety of predominately a cappella literature of all periods and styles. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU67: Advanced Chorus IV
This course emphasizes development of advanced vocal and choral skills and adds the performance of selected standard literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU68: Band III
This course continues to develop instrumental skills and to increase knowledge of fundamentals of music. Band rehearses and performs all types and styles of band literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU69: Band IV
This course continues to develop instrumental skills and to increase knowledge of fundamentals of music. Band rehearses and performs all types and styles of band literature. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU71: Guitar Ensemble IV
This course is open to students with previous experience in playing classical guitar. The emphasis is on performance and ensemble playing. Students play duets, trios, and quartets with other class members. Popular music using choral and melodic accompaniment is taught. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU72: Madrigal Choir IV
This course is a selective chamber ensemble made up of 8-16 students in grades 9-12. The course emphasizes the study of various styles of a cappella singing including: Madrigals, Vocal Jazz, Folk and Art Song arrangements and other classical genres. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances, which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU74: Chorus III
This course develops and refines fundamental vocal techniques including correct breathing, proper tone placement, and pure vowel pronunciation. Achievement of desired choral blend and balance of parts through application of proper singing skills is stressed. Skills in score reading are developed through rehearsal of music literature representative of a diversity of styles. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.
MU75: Chorus IV
This course develops and refines fundamental vocal techniques including correct breathing, proper tone placement, and pure vowel pronunciation. Achievement of desired choral blend and balance of parts through application of proper singing skills is stressed. Skills in score reading are developed through rehearsal of music literature representative of a diversity of styles. This is a performing organization requiring out-of-school time including evenings and possible weekends. Students taking this course must accept the responsibility of attending outside of school performances which are graded. Students may take this course more than one time.

 

Family and Consumer Sciences

FC01: Introduction To Food Preparation And Hospitality
This course introduces students to the food service and hospitality industry. Emphasis is placed on basic food preparation techniques, safety and sanitation procedures, food service equipment, food composition, culinary math, customer relations, and career preparation. Students can begin to accrue hours to meet the 400-hour work- based learning experience (both paid and unpaid) requirement of the National ProStart Certification of Achievement. All students enrolled in this course must take the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation end-of-course exam (ProStart I).
FC02: Advanced Food Preparation And Hospitality
This course is designed to prepare students to work in the food service and hospitality industry. Emphasis is placed on creating menus, applying purchasing techniques, practicing inventory and cost controlling procedures and demonstrating advanced culinary skills. Students can continue to accrue hours to meet the 400-hour work-based learning experience requirement of the National ProStart Certificate of Achievement. All students enrolled in this course must take the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation end-of-course exam (ProStart II).
FC03: Food And Hospitality Management
This course is designed to prepare students to perform managerial duties, quantity production, and practice service skills used in institutional, commercial, or self-owned food establishments or other food service industry occupations. Emphasis is placed on mass production, government regulations, kitchen safety and sanitation, commercial equipment, purchasing procedures, food presentation, maintaining forms and records, and career preparation. Students can continue to accrue hours to meet the 400-hour work-based learning experience requirement of the National ProStart Certificate of Achievement. All students enrolled in this course must take the National Restaurant Association Education Foundation food safety and sanitation certification exam (ServSafe).
FC04: Food And Hospitality Practicum
This course prepares students for employment and advancement in the field of hospitality and food and beverage management or culinary/pastry arts. Emphasis is placed on applying academic, technical and workplace skills during industry-mentored work-based learning experiences. Students who have passed the ProStart I and II exams and have completed the 400-hour work-based learning experience requirement, will earn the National ProStart Certificate of Achievement. Note: Students earning the National ProStart Certificate of Achievement and ServSafe certification are eligible to receive credit through the Stratford University under the articulation agreement. See your Family and Consumer Sciences teacher for further information.
FC05: Clothing And Textiles
This course is designed to provide the basic skills in using the sewing machine and sewing equipment, buying and using patterns, making wise consumer decisions, practicing simple sewing techniques, studying properties of textiles, and planning and caring for wardrobes.
FC09: Housing And Interior Design
This course is designed to acquaint the student with the fields of housing, interior design, and the decorative arts. It will give the student a basic background in principles of design which can be used for further study in the field. It will also help to better meet future housing and design needs.
FC10: Independent And Family Living
This course is designed to help young adults explore and analyze their role in the family, community and society. Decision-making techniques are emphasized through examination of personality development, interpersonal relationships, lifestyle choices and adjustments, family composition and function, resource management, and career exploration.
FC11: Learning About Children
This course focuses on child development from conception through age eight. Students will explore how physical, emotional, social and intellectual development are fostered and hindered. Emphasis is placed on helping students understand how the knowledge of child growth and development, coupled with appropriate attitudes and skills, will help them develop positive parenting practices and increase self-understanding. A behavior contract will be required of all students working with young children. Note: Students earning an “A” or “B” are eligible to receive credit through Harford Community College under the articulation agreement. See your Family and Consumer Sciences teacher for further information.
FC12: Working With Children I
This course is designed to give students the necessary knowledge, skills and experiences for organizing and implementing a program for preschool children. Emphasis is placed on developing learning activities and materials to be used in a child care program. Options and educational requirements for careers in child care and/or early childhood education are explored. A behavior contract will be required of all students working with young children. Note: Students earning an “A” or “B” are eligible to receive credit through Harford Community College under the articulation agreement. See your Family and Consumer Sciences teacher for further information.
FC13: Working With Children II
This course is designed to prepare students for careers in child care and/or early childhood education. Students will continue to apply the principles and theories of child development while planning, teaching, and performing administrative duties in the child development laboratory. Emphasis is placed on the skills, knowledge, and attitudes needed to work effectively with children, parents, and staff and the importance of ethics, professionalism, and continuing education in pursuing a career. A behavior contract will be required of all students working with young children.
FC15: Consumer And Resource Management
This course is designed to explore resource management and consumer choices. Decision-making techniques will be emphasized in areas of personal finances, health, clothing, food, transportation, housing, leisure time, and employment.
FC17W: Human Growth And Development Through Adolescence
Human Growth and Development through Adolescence focuses on human development from birth through adolescence. Emphasis is placed on theories of physical, cognitive, and psychosocial development, the effect of heredity and the environment, the role of caregivers and the family, health and safety concerns, and contemporary issues. Students explore special challenges to growth and development. Students will have opportunities for guided observation of children from birth through adolescence in a variety of settings to help students further understand theories of human development. Students will begin to develop the components of a working portfolio. Note: Students earning an “A” or “B” are eligible to receive credit through Harford Community College, Towson University, Stevenson University, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, or Coppin State University under the articulation agreements. See your Family and Consumer Sciences teacher for further information.
FC18W: Teaching As A Profession
This course focuses on the profession of teaching – its history, purpose, issues, ethics, laws and regulations, roles, and qualifications. Emphasis is placed on identifying the current, historical, philosophical and social perspectives of American education, including trends and issues. Students will explore major approaches to human learning. Students will participate in guided observations and field experiences in multiple settings to help them assess their personal interest in pursuing careers in this field and to identify effective learning environments. Students will continue to develop the components of a working portfolio to be assembled upon completion of the internship. Note: Students earning an “A” or “B” are eligible to receive credit through Harford Community College, Towson University, Stevenson University, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, or Coppin State University under the articulation agreements. See your Family and Consumer Sciences teacher for further information.
FC19W: Foundations Of Curriculum And Instruction
This course explores curriculum delivery models in response to the developmental needs of all children. Emphasis is placed on the development of varied instructional materials and activities to promote learning, classroom management strategies, and a supportive classroom environment. Students will explore basic theories of motivation that increase learning. Students will participate in guided observations and field experiences to critique classroom lessons in preparation for developing and implementing their own. Students will continue to develop the components of a working portfolio to be assembled upon completion of the internship. Note: Students earning an “A” or “B” are eligible to receive credit through Harford Community College, Towson University, Stevenson University, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, or Coppin State University under the articulation agreements. See your Family and Consumer Sciences teacher for further information.
FC21W: Teacher Academy Of Maryland Internship
The internship is the culminating course of the Teacher Academy of Maryland Program. Students will have an opportunity to integrate content and pedagogical knowledge in an educational area of interest. They will have an opportunity to extend and apply their knowledge about teaching in a classroom setting under the supervision of a mentor teacher. The students will complete their working portfolio and present it for critique. Note: Students earning an “A” or “B” are eligible to receive credit through Harford Community College, Towson University, Stevenson University, St. Mary’s College of Maryland, or Coppin State University under the articulation agreements. See your Family and Consumer Sciences teacher for further information.

 

World Languages

FL01: French I
This course introduces the student to the listening, speaking, writing, and reading of French. Students are required to memorize and reproduce vocabulary, to communicate orally in French, to write with grammatical accuracy, and to demonstrate an appreciation of the cultures of the French speaking world. Note: Based on course grades and examination results, HCPS will award credit for completion of French I, German I, and Spanish I in middle school. Credit awarded for completion of French I, German I, and Spanish I in middle school will contribute toward the World Language graduation requirements.
FL02: French II
This course requires the student to attain a functional degree of communicative proficiency in each of the four skill areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Vocabulary and grammar are expanded through a combination of teacher-directed and student-produced oral and written activities. A continued emphasis is placed on the development of cultural awareness.
FL03: French III
This course requires the student to attain a communicative proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through independent and group interactions. The course includes a more advanced study of the vocabulary and structure of the language, as well as a study of history, using short literary selections in addition to authentic materials.
FL04W: French IV
This course of study promotes the continued understanding and refinement of the linguistic, cultural, historical, and literary features associated with the acquisition of the French language. It is expected that the student will communicate primarily in the target language.
FL06: AP French Language and Culture
Advanced Placement French Language and Culture is a college level course designed to provide students with an ability to not only communicate in the French language, but also to understand the linguistic patterns of the language via an array of prescribed AP reading selections. Students will further their understanding of the French language through additional oral and writing activities. Students may take the College Board Advanced Placement Test at the completion of the course.
FL07: Spanish I
This course introduces the student to the listening, speaking, writing, reading and culture of the Spanish-speaking world. Students are required to memorize and reproduce vocabulary, to communicate orally in Spanish, to write with grammatical accuracy, and to demonstrate an appreciation of the cultures of the Spanish-speaking world. Note: Based on course grades and examination results, HCPS will award credit for completion of French I, German I, and Spanish I in middle school. Credit awarded for completion of French I, German I, and Spanish I in middle school will contribute toward the World Language graduation requirements.
FL08: Spanish II
This course encourages the student to attain a functional degree of communicative proficiency in each of the four skill areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Vocabulary and grammar are expanded through a combination of teacher-directed and student-produced oral and written activities. A continued emphasis is placed on the development of cultural awareness throughout the Spanish-speaking world.
FL09: Spanish III
This course promotes and encourages the student attainment of communicative proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through independent and group interactions. The course includes a more advanced study of the vocabulary and structure of the language, as well as a study of history, short literary selections, and authentic cultural awareness activities relevant to the Spanish-speaking world.
FL10W: Spanish IV
This course of study promotes the continued understanding and refinement of the linguistic, cultural, historical and literary features associated with the acquisition of the Spanish language, and the Spanish-speaking cultures. It is expected that the student will communicate primarily in the target language.
FL11: AP Spanish Literature and Culture
Advanced Placement Spanish Literature and Culture is a college level course designed to provide students with an introduction to literature written in Spanish. The course introduces students to the formal study of a representative body of texts from Peninsular Spanish, Latin American, and U.S. Hispanic literature. The course provides opportunities for students to demonstrate their proficiency in Spanish across the three modes of communication and the five goal area outlined in the Standards for Foreign Language Learning in the 21st Century. Students may take the College Board Advanced Placement Test at the completion of the course.
FL12: AP Spanish Language and Culture
Advanced Placement Spanish Language and Culture is a college level course designed to provide students with an ability to not only communicate in the Spanish language, but also to understand the linguistic patterns of the language via an array of prescribed AP reading selections. Students will further their understanding of the Spanish language through additional oral and writing activities. Students may take the College Board Advanced Placement Test at the completion of the course.
FL13: German I
This course introduces the student to the listening, speaking, writing, and reading of German. Students are required to memorize and reproduce vocabulary, to communicate orally in German, to write with grammatical accuracy, and to demonstrate an appreciation of the target culture's geography and culture. Note: Based on course grades and examination results, HCPS will award credit for completion of French I, German I, and Spanish I in middle school. Credit awarded for completion of French I, German I, and Spanish I in middle school will contribute toward the World Language graduation requirements.
FL14: German II
This course requires the student to attain a functional degree of communicative proficiency in each of the four skill areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Vocabulary and grammar are expanded through a combination of teacher-directed and student-produced oral and written activities. A continued emphasis is placed on the development of cultural awareness.
FL15: German III
This course requires the student to attain a communicative proficiency in listening, speaking, reading, and writing through independent and group interactions. The course includes a more advanced study of the vocabulary and structure of the language, as well as a study of history, short literary selections in addition to authentic materials. The German language will be used for personal enjoyment, enrichment, and for the development of an appreciation of German culture.
FL16W: German IV
This course promotes the continued understanding and refinement of the linguistic, cultural, historical, and literary features associated with the acquisition of the language. It is expected that the student will communicate primarily in the target language.
FL18: AP German Language and Culture
Advanced Placement German Language and Culture is a college level course designed to provide students with an ability to not only communicate in the German language, but also to understand the linguistic patterns of the language via an array of prescribed AP reading selections. Students will further their understanding of the German language through additional oral and writing activities. Students may take the College Board Advanced Placement Test at the completion of the course.
FL40: Arabic I
This course introduces the student to the listening, speaking, writing, and reading of Arabic. Students are required to memorize and reproduce vocabulary, to communicate orally in Arabic, to write with grammatical accuracy, and to demonstrate an appreciation of the cultures of the Arabic-speaking world. Note: This course is open to students at Aberdeen High School only and is taught in a blended learning environment. This course cannot be taken as part of a two-year sequence, as Arabic II will not be offered.

 

Health

HE01: Health
Health is a required course, which must be successfully completed for graduation. Topics that are emphasized include consumer health, disease prevention and control, mental health, assimilated substances, and healthful lifestyles. Also included in the health curriculum are units requiring parental permission on teenage pregnancy, sexually transmitted diseases, personal body safety, and HIV/AIDS. Alternate units are offered to students without parent consent forms. Successful completion of this course earns the one-half health credit required for graduation.
HE02: Advanced Health
This course is designed for students interested in an in-depth study of health issues related to the human body. Focus will be placed on physiology, nutrition, physical fitness, disease, mental health/stress management, substance use and abuse, and the life cycle.
HE03: Public Health
Public health is the study of preventing disease, prolonging life and promoting health through organized efforts and informed choices of the public, agencies, communities and government. This course is the introduction to public health and will focus on; administration and management, environmental health, maternal health, international and global health, biostatistics, laws, and epidemiology.

 

Mathematics*

MA01: Introduction To Algebra
This course introduces students to mathematical expressions, equations, inequalities, patterns, and functions. Data analysis, probability, statistics, synthetic geometry, problem solving, and applications of algebra to real-life situations are infused into the course. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit for graduation.
MA02: Algebra I
This course continues development of the concepts of algebra. Emphasis will be placed on functions, graphic representations, polynomial expressions, and applications of the Pythagorean theorem. Data analysis, probability, statistics, synthetic geometry, problem solving, and applications of algebra to real-life situations are infused into the course. The completion of this course is sufficient preparation for Integrated Geometry. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit for graduation. NOTE: Based on course grades and examination results, HCPS will award credit for completion of Algebra I and Geometry in middle school. Credit awarded for completion of Algebra I and Geometry in middle school will satisfy general graduation requirements but not mathematics graduation requirements.
MA04: Geometry
This course includes the study of geometry in two and three dimensions, synthetic geometry, and algebraic geometry. Emphasis is placed on mathematical reasoning, problem solving, and applications of geometry to real-life situations. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit for graduation. NOTE: Based on course grades and examination results, HCPS will award credit for completion of Algebra I and Geometry in middle school. Credit awarded for completion of Algebra I and Geometry in middle school will satisfy general graduation requirements but not mathematics graduation requirements.
MA04: Geometry With Seminar
This course includes the study of geometry in two and three dimensions, synthetic geometry, and algebraic geometry. Emphasis is placed on mathematical reasoning, problem solving, and applications of geometry to real-life situations. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit for graduation. NOTE: Based on course grades and examination results, HCPS will award credit for completion of Algebra I and Geometry in middle school. Credit awarded for completion of Algebra I and Geometry in middle school will satisfy general graduation requirements but not mathematics graduation requirements.
MA07W: Honors Algebra II
This course follows the same structure as Algebra II with some variation in course content to allow for an accelerated pace which allows for the advanced study of some algebraic topics. Honors AlgebraII incorporates project opportunities for students to refine and strengthen their understanding of mathematics at an advanced level.  Students are expected to manage independent work, collaborate with others, and fully participate in project-based learning and class discussions.   Successful completion of this course earns one required mathematics credit.
MA07: Algebra II
This course presents topics such as complex numbers, quadratics, conic sections, exponential functions, and progressions. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit required for graduation.
MA07: Algebra II With Seminar
This course presents topics such as complex numbers, quadratics, conic sections, exponential functions, and progressions. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit required for graduation. Note: This course is paired with EL96 Algebra II Seminar meeting on the alternate day to provide additional support for students. Successful completion of the elective seminar course earns one elective credit.
MA09W: Honors Trigonometry
This course emphasizes trigonometric ratios and their applications, complex numbers, functions statistics, probability, sequences, and series. The completion of this course is sufficient preparation for Honors Precalculus. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit for graduation.
MA10W: Honors Precalculus
This course enhances topics taught in Trigonometry, as well as presents additional topics in the area of discrete mathematics. Emphasis is placed on functions, trigonometry, limits, logic, sequences, induction, combinations, and an introduction to the basic ideas of calculus. Students who complete this course should be prepared for AP Calculus. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit required for graduation.
MA13: AP Calculus AB
This college level course will prepare students to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test in Calculus AB. Both differential and integral calculus provide the background for topics which students will encounter in college calculus. Topics such as derivatives, integrals, and limits are explored. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit required for graduation.
MA14: AP Calculus BC
This college level course will prepare students to take the College Board Advanced Placement test in Calculus BC. Students will extend and refine their understanding of derivatives, integrals, and limits. Polynomial approximations and series will be included in the course. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit required for graduation.
MA15: Statistics
This course emphasizes foundational concepts and methods of statistical analysis. Topics include descriptive statistics, probability, binomial and normal distributions, sampling, confidence intervals, hypothesis tests, and linear correlations and regressions. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit required for graduation.
MA16: AP Statistics
This college level course will prepare students to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test in Statistics. The topics for AP Statistics are divided into four major themes: exploratory analysis, planning a study, probability, and statistical inference. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit for graduation.
MA17: AP Computer Science
This college level computer programming course is designed to prepare students for the College Board Advanced Placement Test in Computer Science. JAVA computer language will be used exclusively. This course does not meet University System of Maryland undergraduate core content proficiency requirements for admission. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit for graduation.
MA27: HCC Transitional Mathematics 212223
Aligned with Harford Community College non-credit bearing mathematics courses MA021, MA022, and MA023, this course provides students with an opportunity to extend and refine their understanding of algebra in preparation for enrollment in credit-bearing college level mathematics courses. Topics include polynomial and rational expressions, factoring polynomials, interpreting and modeling linear, quadratic, and exponential functions, reasoning with equations and inequalities, and systems of equations. Each student enrolled in the course will complete a Harford Community College application, complete the Accuplacer assessment, and register for Harford Community College course MA021. Students who earn a “C” or better in MA021 will be permitted to enroll in subsequent Harford Community College transitional studies mathematics courses. This course does not meet University System of Maryland undergraduate core content proficiency requirements for admission. Successful completion of this course earns one mathematics credit required for graduation.

 

Physical Education

PE01: Foundations Of Fitness And Physical Activity
This required course presents fundamental and current topics in the field of physical fitness. It supports and encourages students to develop an individual optimum level of physical fitness, to acquire knowledge of physical fitness concepts, and to understand the significance of lifestyle on one's health and fitness. Successful completion of this course earns one-half credit to meet the State requirement for graduation.
PE02: Physical Education 10 12
Physical education offers a wide variety of activities based on an elective program. This program is designed to meet the individual needs, abilities, and interests of students. Activities rotate on a three-week basis and provide students the opportunity to experience lifetime sports, individual sports, and team and recreational games. Successful completion of this course earns one-half physical education credit.
PE03: Wellness Walking
This course is designed to offer students a low impact aerobic workout. Pacing, mileage, and walking techniques will be stressed daily. Safety information, nutrition, hot/cold weather exercise, as well as health-related issues will be discussed in class. Wellness walking will give the student the opportunity to improve cardiovascular fitness, muscular strength and endurance, and enhance weight control. Successful completion of this course earns one-half physical education credit.
PE04: Exerobics
This semester course is designed for the individual who wants the benefits of cardiovascular training, strength training, increased flexibility, improved agility, improved balance, and rhythm. Successful completion of this course earns one-half physical education credit.
PE06: Weight Training l
This semester course offers the fundamentals of weight training, circuit training, and individual physical fitness conditioning. The student develops an individual program to meet his or her personal athletic development with an emphasis on muscular strength training. Successful completion of this course earns one-half physical education credit.
PE07: Weight Toning
This semester course offers the fundamentals of weight training, circuit training, and individual physical fitness conditioning. The student develops an individual program to meet his or her personal goals with emphasis on enhancing body composition, muscular endurance and overall fitness. Successful completion of this course earns one-half physical education credit.
PE09: Individual Lifetime Fitness Activities
This semester course is designed to develop an awareness of different types of activity to provide health-enhancing levels of physical fitness. Students will experience lifetime activities (i.e. archery, golf, in-line skating) that are needed for an active lifestyle. Successful completion of this course earns one-half physical education credit.

 

Science*

SC01: Earth Science
This course develops an understanding of the earth and space, the interrelationships between them, and the forces that influence each. Through a laboratory-oriented program, the investigative processes of science, as well as the concepts and principles of astronomy, physical geology, historical geology, meteorology, and oceanography are developed. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC02W: Honors Biology
This course follows the same structure as Biology with some variation in course content to allow for an accelerated pace and advanced study of select biological topics. Honors Biology incorporates more complex and sophisticated project and lab-based experiences. Students are expected to manage independent work and function in an environment which requires a greater degree of scientific inquiry. Successful completion of this course earns one required science credit.
SC02: Biology
This course investigates the characteristics of living things through a laboratory-oriented program that includes the nature of life, the continuity of life, and the diversity of life. Successful completion of this course earns one required science credit. Successful completion of this course and a passing score on the State High School Assessment for Biology are required for graduation.
SC03: AP Biology
This college level course is designed to include the study of vertebrate anatomy, biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, and general plant biology. At the completion of this course, students are eligible to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC04W: Honors Chemistry
This course follows the same structure as Chemistry with some variation in course content to allow for an accelerated pace and advanced study of select chemistry topics. Honors Chemistry incorporates more complex and sophisticated project and lab-based experiences. Students are expected to manage independent work and function in an environment which requires a greater degree of scientific inquiry. Successful completion of this course earns one required science credit.
SC04: Chemistry
This course introduces students to the basic concepts and principles of the classification and the structure of matter, measurements and calculations involving matter and energy, and matter-energy relationships. An integral part of the course is the laboratory where students collect and analyze data. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC05: AP Chemistry
This college level course will differ qualitatively from a first-year chemistry course with respect to the nature of textbooks used, the topics covered, the emphasis on chemical calculations, the mathematical formulation of principles, and the variety of laboratory work done by students. Quantitative differences will be evident in the number of topics treated, the time expended on the course, and the nature and variety of experiments completed in the laboratory. At the completion of this course, students are eligible to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC06W: Hnr Physics
This course follows the same structure as Physics with some variation in course content to allow for an accelerated pace and advanced study of select physics topics. Honors Physics incorporates more complex and sophisticated project and lab-based experiences. Students are expected to manage independent work and function in an environment which requires a greater degree of scientific inquiry. Successful completion of this course earns one required science credit.
SC06: Physics
This course is an introductory course for students interested in future studies in science, mathematics, or engineering. Topics such as force, motion, work, energy, heat, wave motion, electricity, magnetism, light, and radioactivity are investigated through applied mathematics and laboratory work. Applications of physics to everyday life will be demonstrated. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC08: Environmental Science I
This course is the study of the relationships between living things and their environment. Origins and solutions of environmental problems will be investigated using laboratory and field studies. Topics of study include ecosystems, interaction of flora and fauna, population dynamics, air and water quality, resource management, waste management and other environmental issues, and the decision-making process. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC09: Environmental Science II
This course is designed so that students may study those topics introduced in Environmental Science I in greater depth, apply problem-solving strategies, explore new topics, and understand the role of government as it applies to environmental problems. Topics of study include land use, energy generation, and aquatics, specifically a unit on Mapping and Monitoring Maryland Streams, and environmental issue investigations which focus on independent research and an informed decision-making process. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC10: AP Environmental Science
This course is designed to be the equivalent of a one semester, introductory college course in environmental science. The curriculum will provide students with the scientific principles, concepts and methodologies required to understand the natural world and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine the alternative solutions for resolving and/or preventing them. This will be a rigorous science course with a lab component that will emphasize field studies.
SC11: Applied Science
This course is an introduction to the application of fundamental concepts of science through the study of consumer science, household chemistry, energy in the home, and other topics of interest to consumers and workers. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC12W: Microbiology
This course is designed for those students interested in biological careers. Basic microbiological techniques, culturing, and roles of microorganisms will be investigated. General genetics and concepts of immunology will also be studied. Much time will be devoted to laboratory skills. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC13W: Anatomy And Physiology
This course is designed for students interested in future studies in the biological sciences or the medical fields. This course extends the ideas and concepts of general biology emphasizing mammalian structure and function with application to the human body. Dissection of preserved specimens occurs as part of instructional activities within this course. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC14W: Biochemistry
This course is designed for students interested in future studies in scientific areas. In one semester the student learns the basic principles of organic chemistry and biochemistry. The other semester involves a study of animal morphology, physiology, and vertebrate anatomy with a special emphasis on mammalian anatomy. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC15: Marine Science
This semester course deals with the chemistry, physics, and biology of lakes, streams, bays, and oceans. Topics of study include aquatic topography, the effects of salinity, pressure, light, temperature, and currents on aquatic organisms, game fish, and the ecology and management of ponds and streams for game fish.Dissection of preserved specimens occurs as part of instructional activities within this course. Successful completion of this course earns one-half of a science credit.
SC16: Astronomy
This semester course traces the development of astronomical thought from constellations to quasars. Areas explored include the earth-moon systems, the solar systems, the sun, stars, galaxies, and cosmology. Through the use of the planetarium and laboratory experiences, students make observations, conduct physical experiments, and interpret data gathered by scientists. Successful completion of this course earns one-half of a science credit.
SC17W: Zoology
This semester course is designed to give students a broad overview of both vertebrate and invertebrate zoology, with special emphasis on slide preparation and anatomical comparison. Dissection of preserved specimens occurs as part of instructional activities within this course. Cellular organization, chemical control, and biochemical aspects are the major topics of study. Successful completion of this course earns one-half of a science credit.
SC18: Botany
This semester course includes a detailed physiognomic study of the plant kingdom including morphological, anatomical, and physiological characteristics. Emphasis is placed upon the relationships between the major divisions of plants and the environment. Human dependence upon plants will be stressed, as well as ecological considerations. Successful completion of this course earns one-half of a science credit.
SC21W: Forensic Science
This course introduces students to the scientific principles and laboratory procedures used to collect, process, and analyze physical and biological evidence during the investigation of a crime. The application and interaction of science to our system of justice is part of the course objectives. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC28: AP Physics C
This course is designed to be the equivalent of a first-year college physics course. Topics included are mechanics, electricity, and magnetism. This course prepares students for the College Board Advanced Placement Test.
SC60: AP Physics 1
This course is designed to be the equivalent of a first-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers Newtonian mechanics (including rotational dynamics and angular momentum), work, energy, power, mechanical waves, sound, and electric circuits. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit and prepares students for the College Board Advanced Placement Test.
SC61: AP Physics 2
This course is designed to be the equivalent of a second-semester college course in algebra-based physics. The course covers fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, optics, and atomic and nuclear physics. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit and prepares students for the College Board Advanced Placement Test.
SC62: Geohazards Engineering
This project-based course examines the interaction between extreme geologic phenomena and humans. Topics of study will address the geologic and engineering processes involved in analyzing and reducing hazards related to phenomena such as earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes, and floods. The course will culminate with a team project designed to showcase a variety of science and engineering practices. Successful completion of this course earns one science credit.
SC63: HCC Chemistry 101
This course is an introduction to students requiring a full year of chemistry. The structure of matter and its behavior from a chemical perspective is presented. Topics include atomic and molecular structure, chemical bonding, periodic relationships, principles of chemical reactions, and properties of state and solutions.
SC64W: Honors Integrated Physics and Chemistry
This course follows the same structure as Physical Science with some variation in course content to allow for an accelerated pace and advanced study of select physical science topics. Honors Physical Science incorporates more complex and sophisticated project and lab-based experiences. Students are expected to manage independent work and function in an environment which requires a greater degree of scientific inquiry. Successful completion of this course earns one required science credit.
SC64: Integrated Physics and Chemistry
This course provides opportunities for students to engage in the investigation and application of the Physical Sciences to include both Chemistry and Physics. The blended nature of this course emphasizes the interdisciplinary nature of science and its role in answering questions about the natural and designed world. Chemistry and Physics concepts are investigated through laboratory experiences designed to promote and develop appropriate skills in scientific inquiry. Successful completion of this course earns one required science credit.

 

Social Studies

SS01W: Honors American Government
This course requires students to engage in intensive study of the concepts of responsibility, authority, justice, and political participation as they relate to the form and function of government. Students will be expected to complete more detailed writing, research projects, and activities requiring collaborative and critical thinking beyond that of a standard government course. Students are required to take the state assessment in American Government. Successful completion of this course earns the required state credit in American Government.
SS01: American Government
This course requires students to study the concepts of responsibility, authority, justice, and participation as they relate to the form and function of government. Students are also required to take the state assessment in Government. Successful completion of this course earns the required Government credit.
SS02: World History
This course will cover the period from the Renaissance to the present. The student studies the people and events that have shaped our world since the early Middle Ages. The course culminates with a study of the twentieth century. Successful completion of this course earns the required World History credit.
SS03: AP World History
This college level course provides students with an in-depth examination of the cultural, institutional, and technological factors that have influenced human society in the past one thousand years. This course examines the accomplishments and global impact of societies in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and Europe. At the completion of this course, students are eligible to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test. Successful completion of this course earns the required World History credit.
SS04: AP European History
This college level course involves a study of the changes in the political, diplomatic, international, cultural, societal, and economic make up of Europe from 1450 to the present. At the completion of this course, students are eligible to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test.
SS05: HCC US History 103
This course will cover the period of United States history from 1865 to the present. It is designed to increase student understanding of how the nation grew in power and prestige throughout the last 125 years. Successful completion of this course earns the required United States History credit.
SS05: HCC US History 104
This course will cover the period of United States history from 1865 to the present. It is designed to increase student understanding of how the nation grew in power and prestige throughout the last 125 years. Successful completion of this course earns the required United States History credit.
SS05: US History
This course will cover the period of United States history from 1865 to the present. It is designed to increase student understanding of how the nation grew in power and prestige throughout the last 125 years. Successful completion of this course earns the required United States History credit.
SS06: AP US History
This college level course is an in-depth study of American history from 1780 to the present. At the completion of this course, students are eligible to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test. Successful completion of this course earns the required United States History credit.
SS07: AP American Government Politics
This college level course is designed to give students a critical perspective on politics and government in the United States. This course involves both the study of general concepts used to interpret American politics and the analysis of specific case studies. Successful completion of this course earns the required Government credit. At the completion of this course students are eligible to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test.
SS09: AP Psychology
This college level course involves a detailed study of all the major subfields of psychology. These include History and Methods, Biological Bases of Behavior, Sensation and Perception, States of Consciousness, Learning, Cognition, Motivation and Emotion, Human Development, Personality, Testing, Abnormal Behavior, and Therapy and Social Psychology. Major emphasis is placed on reading, writing, analysis, experiments, demonstrations, and discussion. At the completion of this course students are eligible and encouraged to take the College Board Advanced Placement Examination.
SS10: African American History
This course includes an examination of the African backgrounds from which stem the heritage of African Americans in America. It traces the exploitation of African Americans as they were brought from Africa to America and the history of African Americans up to the present time. Emphasis is placed upon contributions made by African Americans in art, music, literature, sports, entertainment, business, government, education, science, and law.
SS11: Contemporary Issues
This course allows students to examine current issues, events, and themes relevant to four areas of study: Foreign Policy and National Security, Economics, Political Issues, and Social Issues. Students will employ a variety of social studies skills, including reading, writing, research, and decision-making in making analytical connections with content in the four domains.
SS12: Psychology
This course provides an overview to the discipline of psychology. Course content will include psychological methods, intelligence and testing, learning, social psychology, and biological influences on behavior.
SS13: Sociology
This course involves the study of human interaction, social institutions, and fundamental social processes. Some specific topics include the problems of deviant behavior and social adjustment, patterns of cooperation, competition and conflict, juvenile delinquency, drug and alcohol abuse, and the family structure.
SS14: Law In America
This course involves the study of the different ways the law significantly affects the life of an individual. It also develops a basic understanding of how law is a standard of conduct, which attempts to regulate interaction among individuals and their relationship to government.
SS15: Economics
This course acquaints students with basic economic theories. This will be accomplished through a realistic study of economic principles, combined with an inquiry into those situations that the student will face as a member of society. Some of the topics to be considered will be scarcity of resources, business organizations, money and banking, the stock market, labor trends, and foreign trade.
SS16: World Geography
This course provides students with an opportunity to examine concepts, theories, and issues in major fields of geographic study such as physical, cultural, and economic geography. Students will apply geographic theory and process in analyzing issues affecting various world regions, individually and collectively.
SS17: Student Service Learning
The student service learning course is an independent study experience with the teacher acting as a facilitator. This program will provide students the opportunity to perform useful service and to learn from the experience of service. Students engaged in this course will be involved in a process that incorporates awareness, involvement, and reflection with experiences that will benefit society and promote citizenship as well as personal development. This course meets the state graduation requirement for student service.
SS21: AP Human Geography
This college-level course introduces students to the systematic study of patterns and processes that have shaped human understanding, use, and alteration of the Earth’s surface. Students employ spatial concepts and landscape analysis to examine human social organization and its environmental consequences. They also learn about the methods and tools geographers use in their science and practice. At the completion of the course students are eligible to take the College Board Advanced Placement Test.
SS23: AP Comparative Government
In AP Comparative Government students are introduced to fundamental concepts used by political scientists to study the processes and outcomes of politics in a variety of settings. The course aims to illustrate the rich diversity of political life, to show available instructional alternatives, to explain differences in processes and policy outcomes, and to communicate the importance of global political and economic changes. Students can expect to use comparative political concepts, themes, and generalizations to examine the governments and politics of China, Great Britain, Iran, Mexico, Nigeria, and Russia. At the completion of this course students are eligible and encouraged to take the College Board Advanced Placement Examination.
SS34: AP Microeconomics
The purpose of the AP course in Microeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to the functions of individual decision makers, both consumers and producers, within the economic system. It places primary emphasis on the nature and functions of product markets and includes the study of factor markets and of the role of government in promoting greater efficiency and equity in the economy. At the completion of this course students are eligible and encouraged to take the College Board Advanced Placement Examination.
SS35: AP Macroeconomics
The purpose of the AP course in Macroeconomics is to give students a thorough understanding of the principles of economics that apply to an economic system as a whole. The course places particular emphasis on the study of national income and price-level determination, and also develops students’ familiarity with economic performance measures, the financial sector, stabilization policies, economic growth, and international economics. At the completion of this course students are eligible and encouraged to take the College Board Advanced Placement Examination.

 

Technology Education

TE05: Foundations Of Technology
Foundations of Technology is an activity-based course designed for students to learn about the nature of technology, the impacts of technology on society, the engineering design and development process, the core technologies, and the technologies of the designed world. Students focus on the integration of technology, science, and mathematics to create solutions to problems associated with the major enterprises that produce the goods and services of the designed world. Problem solving experiences will center on the use of tools, machines, and materials to design and construct models, devices, and products that creatively solve complex technological problems. Foundations of Technology has been designated as a course for all students in Harford County Public Schools as part of the Maryland State Department of Education’s Technology Education graduation requirement.
TE10: Technological Design
In the Technological Design course, the engineering scope, content, and professional practices are presented through practical applications. Students apply technology, science, and mathematic concepts and skills to solve engineering design problems and innovate designs. Students research, develop, test, and analyze engineering designs using criteria such as design effectiveness, public safety, human factors, and ethics. This course contributes to the student’s capacity to understand how technology’s development, control, and use are based on design constraints and human wants and needs.
TE11: Advanced Design Applications
The Advanced Design Applications course consists of four units that include Manufacturing, Energy and Power, Construction and Transportation. The Manufacturing Unit examines the advances that maintain manufacturing efficiency, how human consumption affects manufacturing, how manufacturing affects the standard of living of various peoples and how processing and changing raw materials can produce more desirable products. The Construction Unit examines a number of the factors influencing the design and construction of permanent and semi-permanent structures, the practices related to construction maintenance, alteration, and renovation, and the functions of the primary systems installed in those structures. The Energy and Power Unit explores the relationship between energy and power technologies and all other technologies, and how modern energy and power systems impact cultures, societies, and the environment. The Transportation Unit examines the complex networks of interconnected subsystems that each transportation system comprises and the roles of these components in the overall functional process of the system. It also analyzes of the improvements and the impacts of transportation technologies on the environment, society, and culture.
TE12: Advanced Technological Applications
In the Advanced Technological Applications course students study about the four components of the Designed World: Information and Communication Technologies, Medical Technologies, Agriculture and Biotechnologies, and Entertainment/Recreation Technologies. The Information and Communication Unit examines how technology facilitates the gathering, manipulation, storage, and transmission of data, and how this data can be used to create useful products. It also provides students with opportunities for developing communication systems that can solve technological problems. The Medical Unit provides an analysis of how medical technologies are used to increase the quality and length of human life, and how increased use of technology carries potential consequences, which require public debate. The Agriculture and Biotechnologies Unit explores how agricultural technologies provide increased crop yields and allow adaptation to changing and harsh environments, enabling the growth of plants and animals for various uses. It also offers an analysis of the various uses of biotechnology and the ethical considerations of those uses. The Entertainment and Recreation Unit provides a study of technological entertainment and recreation systems, with an examination of the differences between these technologies, of how their use enhances human leisure-time performance, and of the social, cultural, and environmental implications of their usage.
TE34: Introduction To Engineering Design PLTW
This foundation course emphasizes the development of a design. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards and document their work.  Students use industry standard 3D modeling software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. (This course satisfies the technology education requirement normally met with Foundations of Technology and this option is only available at Aberdeen and C. Milton Wright High Schools.) 
TE40: AP Computer Science Principles
Advanced Placement (AP) Computer Science Principles is a course will introduce students to the essential ideas of computer science and show how computing and technology can influence the world around us. Students will be introduced to the central idea of computer science, instilling the idea of computational thinking in addition to understanding how computing changes the world. Students will have the opportunity to creatively address real-world issues and concerns while using the same processes and tools as artists, writers, computer scientists, and engineers to bring ideas to life. Note: AP Computer Science Principles has been designated as a course for all students in Harford County Public Schools as part of the Maryland State Department of Education’s Technology Education graduation requirement.