Specialized Programs

Specialized programs in Harford County Public Schools are defined as a high school program recognized under the Maryland State Department of Education approved Career and Technology Education (CTE) programs. In Harford County, these programs are offered at selected high schools and are available to students in that community attendance area.

Aberdeen High School and C. Milton Wright High School
Career and Technology Education Program
Pre-Engineering

The Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Pre-Engineering Program is a Career and Technology Education (CTE) instructional program that incorporates the national standards of The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, the National Science Standards and the International Technology Education Association. Students complete three foundation courses; at least one pathway course in aerospace engineering, biotechnical engineering, biological engineering, computer-integrated manufacturing, or civil engineering and architecture; and a capstone course which enables students to work in teams to design and build solutions to authentic engineering problems. Students who qualify can earn transcripted credit at PLTW-affiliated colleges and universities nationwide, including the University of Maryland-Baltimore County.

Required Courses:

Foundation Courses (All three of the following are required.)

Specialization Courses (One of the following is required. Student interest/enrollment will dictate which one(s) will be offered.) Capstone Course (The following is a required course.)

Introduction to Engineering Design (IED) - TE34
Grades: 09-10

This foundation course emphasizes the development of a design. Through hands-on projects, students apply engineering standards and document their work. Students use industry standard 3D modeling software to help them design solutions to solve proposed problems, document their work using an engineer’s notebook, and communicate solutions to peers and members of the professional community. (This course satisfies the technology education requirement normally met with Foundations of Technology.)

Prerequisite: None

Principles of Engineering (POE) - CT33
Grades: 10-11

This foundation course provides an overview of engineering and engineering technology and exposes students to major concepts they'll encounter in a postsecondary engineering course of study. Topics include mechanisms, energy, statics, materials, and kinematics. They develop problem-solving skills and apply their knowledge of research and design to create solutions to various challenges, document their work and communicate solutions.

Prerequisite: IED, Trigonometry (Recommended to be taken prior to POE or concurrently with POE)

Digital Electronics (DE) - CT36
Grades: 10-11

This foundation course introduces students to applied digital logic, a key element of careers in engineering and engineering technology. This course explores the smart circuits found in all modern electronic devices such as mobile phones, MP3 players, laptop computers, digital cameras and high-definition televisions. Students are introduced to the process of combinational and sequential logic design, engineering standards and technical documentation. This course is designed for 10th and 11th grade students.

Prerequisite: IED

Aerospace Engineering (AE) - CT39
Grades: 11-12

This specialization course explores the evolution of flight, navigation and control, flight fundamentals, aerospace materials, propulsion, space travel, and orbital mechanics. In addition, this course presents alternative applications for aerospace engineering concepts. Students analyze, design, and build aerospace systems. They apply knowledge gained throughout the course in a final presentation about the future of the industry and their professional goals.

Prerequisite: IED, POE

Environmental Sustainability (ES) - CA01
Grades: 11-12

An alternative to the final capstone project will be an online dual enrollment option through Harford Community College where the student will complete six credits in approved business courses between the Fall and Spring semesters. These courses will be taken at the student's high school and facilitated by a high school teacher.

Prerequisite: IED, POE

Civil Engineering and Architecture (CEA) - CT48
Grades: 11-12

This specialization course explores the interrelationship and dependence of the fields of civil engineering and architecture on each other. Students apply their knowledge to the design and development of residential and commercial properties and structures. In addition, students use 3D design software to design and document solutions for major course projects. Students communicate and present solutions to their peers and member of a professional community of engineers and architects.

Prerequisite: IED, POE

Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) - CA02
Grades: 11-12

This specialization course explores the fundamentals of computerized manufacturing technology. Students use 3D computer software to solve design problems. They assess their solutions through mass propriety analysis (the relationship of design, function and materials), modify their designs, and use Computer Numerical Control (CNC) equipment to produce 3-D prototype models. In addition, students will work in teams to design manufacturing work cells and tabletop factories to solve complex problems that arise in integrating multiple pieces of computer-controlled equipment.

Prerequisite: IED, POE

Engineering Design and Development (EDD) - CT52
Grades: 12

In this capstone course, students work in teams to design and develop an original solution to a valid open-ended technical problem by applying the engineering design process. Students perform research to choose, validate, and justify a technical problem. After carefully defining the problem, teams design, build, and test their solutions while working closely with industry professionals who provide mentoring opportunities. At the end of the course, student teams present and defend their original solution to an outside panel.

Prerequisite: IED, DE, POE and at least one specialization course

Bel Air High School and
Havre de Grace High School
Career and Technology Education Program
Biomedical Sciences

The Project Lead the Way (PLTW) Biomedical Sciences Program is a Career and Technology Education (CTE) instructional program that is based on the National Standards for Science, Mathematics, and English Language Arts, and the Accountability Criteria for National Health Care Cluster Foundation Standards. The program consists of a sequence of four courses: Principals of the Biomedical Sciences, Human Body Systems, Medical Interventions, and Biomedical Innovations. The goal of the program is to increase the number of students pursuing careers in the biomedical sciences, including healthcare. Students who qualify can earn transcripted credit at Stevenson University, Maryland's PLTW Biomedical Sciences Affiliate University.

Principles of Biomedical Science - CT73
Grades: 9

This course provides an introduction to the biomedical sciences through exciting "hands-on" projects and problems. Student work involves the study of human medicine, research processes and an introduction to bio-informatics. Students investigate the human body systems and various health conditions including heart disease, diabetes, sickle-cell disease, hypercholesterolemia, and infectious diseases. A theme through the course is to determine the factors that led to the death of a fictional person. After determining the factors responsible for the death, the students investigate lifestyle choices and medical treatments that might have prolonged the person's life. Key biological concepts including: homeostasis, metabolism, inheritance of traits, feedback systems, and defense against disease are embedded in the curriculum. Engineering principles including: the design process, feedback loops, fluid dynamics, and the relationship of structure to function are incorporated in the curriculum where appropriate. The course is designed to provide an overview of all the courses in the Biomedical Sciences program and to lay the scientific foundation necessary for student success in the subsequent courses.

Prerequisite: None

Human Body Systems - CT74
Grades: 10

The human body is a complex system requiring care and maintenance. This course will engage students in the study of basic human physiology, especially in relationship to human health. Students will use a variety of monitors to examine body systems (respiratory, circulatory, and nervous) at rest and under stress, and observe the interactions between the various body systems. Students will use LabView® software to design and build systems to monitor body functions.

Prerequisite: Principles of Biomedical Science

Medical Interventions - CT75
Grades: 11

Medical practice includes interventions to support humans in treating disease and maintaining health. Student projects will investigate various medical interventions that extend and improve quality of life, including gene therapy, pharmacology, surgery, prosthetics, rehabilitation, and supportive care. Students will study the design and development of various medical interventions including vascular stents, cochlear implants, and prosthetic limbs. They will review the history of organ transplants and gene therapy, and read current scientific literature to be aware of cutting edge developments. Using 3-D imaging software and current scientific research, students will design and build a model of a therapeutic protein.

Prerequisite: Human Body Systems

Biomedical Innovation - CT76
Grades: 12

This capstone course gives student teams the opportunity to work with a mentor, identify a science research topic, conduct research, write a scientific paper, and defend team conclusions and recommendations to a panel of outside reviewers. Each team will have one or more mentors from the scientific and/or medical community guiding their scientific research.

Prerequisite: Medical Interventions

Edgewood High School
Career and Technology Education Program
Academy of Finance

The National Academy Foundation (NAF) Academy of Finance Program is a Career and Technology Education (CTE) instructional program that prepares students for successful careers in financial services. NAF's structured curriculum provides students with a broad understanding of financial and economic concepts and provides work-based learning opportunities and career courses. The curriculum covers entrepreneurship, banking and credit, financial planning, international finance, securities, insurance, accounting, and economics.

Required Courses:

Principles of Accounting/ Managerial Accounting - BE32

Principles of Accounting provide students with the knowledge that accounting is a process of providing data and information that serves internal and external stakeholders. The second half of this course introduces the fundamentals of management accounting, including manufacturing and cost accounting, budgeting, accounting for managerial decision-making, and fnancial statement analysis. Students learn how to use accounting information for internal decsion-making and planning and control. Students also examine career opportunities and the professional certifications and designations earned by individuals in the accounting profession.

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendations and application approval

Principles of Finance/ Financial Services - BE33

This is the course that gives students a thorough introduction to the concepts, tools, and institutions of the financial world and serves as a foundation for the core courses offered by the Academy of Finance. Students begin by learning the basics of financial literacy and the function of finance in society. The second half of this course provides students with an introduction to an overview of banks and other financial services. It introduces students to the origins of money and banking and examines the early history of banking in the United States. Students study the financial services industry and the types of companies it includes in depth. They learn about the services offered by such companies and analyze the ways these companies earn profits. Finally, students examine careers in financial services.

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendations and application approval

Business Economics/ Professional Economics - BE31

This course provides students with an introduction to the key concepts of business economics includiing supply, demand, profit, costs and markets and differentiates microeconomics from macroeconomics. The course describes forms of business ownership and discusses the relationship of labor and business, then provides a broad overview of the global economy. Finally, because economics affects every business job, students get a chance to examine careers in business, both as an employee and as a business owner. The second half of the course focuses on the significance and importance of ethics to stakeholders; examine who bears responsibility for ensuring an ethical code is followed; and explore ethical situations common in organizations. The course examines ethics through the lens of various business disciplines, and considers the impact of organizational culture on ethical practices. The course also explores ethics as social responsibility, the evolution of ethics as business becomes more international, and how the free market and organizational ethics can co-exist.

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendations and application approval

Financial Planning/ Applied Finance - BE34

This course introduces students to an overview of the job of a financial planner. Students learn to consider how all aspects of financial planning might affect a potential client, and learn about the importance of financial planning in helping people reach their life goals. This course includes lessons on saving, borrowing, credit, and all types of insurance, and covers various types of investments. Students also examine careers in financial planning. The second half of this course delves into the financial concepts introduced in Principles of Finance. Students learn to identify the legal forms of business organization. Students will gain a deeper understanding of the important aspects of finance; including such concepts as profit, sales, the risk-return tradeoff, and the time-value of money. In this course, students read common financial statements and are introduced to business plans. They learn the three most common methods by which businesses raise capital (stocks, bonds, and short-term financing).

Prerequisite: Teacher recommendations and application approval

Entrepreneurship/ Business in a Global Economy (Elective) - BE37

This course introduces students to the critical role entrepreneurs play in the national and global economy. Students learn the skills, attitudes, characteristics, and techniques necessary to become successful entrepreneurs. They explore starting a business and learn about the operational issues and financial risks that new businesses face. Students examine ethical issues and develop a framework for managing them. The second half of the course focuses on providing students with an understanding of how and why businesses choose to expand their operations into other countries. This course exposes students to the unique challenges facing firms doing business internationally, and to the potential opportunities available to those businesses. Building on concepts introduced in Principles of Finance, Business in a Global Economy broadens students' understanding of how businesses operate, grow, and thrive in our ever changing world.

Prerequisite: None

(Students not attending Edgewood High School must contact their School Counselor for application and waiver forms.)

Joppatowne High School
Career and Technology Education Program
Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

The Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness Program is a Career and Technology Education (CTE) instructional program which integrates government, academia, and private sector training/educational initiatives to help students understand how the United States and its interests worldwide are protected against threats to public safety, both natural and manmade, through effective communication, preparedness, detection, prevention, response and recovery. The program offers three career strands: Homeland Security Sciences, Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement, and Information/Communications Technology. These three strands align with the six mission areas of the United States Department of Homeland Security: Intelligence and Warning, Protection of Critical infrastructure and Key Assets, Border and Transportation Security, Domestic Counterterrorism, Defense against Catastrophic Threats, and Emergency Preparedness and Response.

Required Courses (Choose at least 4):
Foundations of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness
(1 Credit)
Homeland Security Sciences Pathway Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement Pathway Information/ Communications Technology Pathway
Homeland Security Science (1 credit) Administration of Justice I (1 credit) S.T.A.R.S. Course I and II (1 Credit)
  • Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
  • Skill-Based Training for Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
Homeland Security Science Research Methods and Applications (1 credit) Administration of Justice II (1 credit) S.T.A.R.S. Course III and IV (1 Credit)
  • Advanced Skill-Based Training for Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
  • Geospatial Application Project
Internship/Capstone Experience (1 credit)
Foundations of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness - CT71
Grades: 10

This course will introduce students to Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness guidelines, concepts, and action plans. Emphasis will be placed on unique aspects of public safety and public health. The course will explore the various methodologies for intelligence gathering and dissemination and will introduce students to various local, state, and federal assets. Students will prepare an action plan that includes initial notification, emergency response (on and off scene), and recovery.

Prerequisite: None

Homeland Security Science - CT77
Grades: 11

This course will introduce students to Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness threats to public safety and health, decontamination, protection, detection and identification, and planning concepts. Emphasis will be placed on the utilization of science to protect the public against chemical and biological threats. The course will explore the various methodologies, capabilities and limitations for individual and collective protection, handheld and fixed detection, and field sampling and laboratory identification. Students will prepare a chemical and biological incident response plan as an end of course assessment.

Prerequisite: Foundations of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

Homeland Security Science Research Methods and Applications - CT78
Grades: 11-12

This course will focus on developing the student's scientific research, problem solving and writing skills. Emphasis will be placed on research and analysis, technical writing, team dynamics, and laboratory analysis and skills. The course will actively engage the student in market survey techniques, technical publication layout and design, team building skills and role play, and proper implementation of laboratory instrumentation and equipment.

Prerequisite: Homeland Security Science

Administration of Justice I - CT79
Grades: 11

This class will introduce students to multiple aspects of criminal justice and law enforcement. Students will explore the criminal process, various forces that impact law enforcement, and the rights of citizens. Students will understand the difference between juvenile and adult justice, and classifications of different crimes. This class will give students a general knowledge needed for students to enter various law enforcement careers at the federal, state, and local levels. Note: Students earning an "A" or "B" are eligible to receive credit through Harford Community College under the articulation agreement. See your teacher for further information.

Prerequisite: Foundations of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

Administration of Justice II - CT80
Grades: 11-12

This class will continue the student's knowledge of criminal justice and law enforcement. In this course students will be introduced to evidence collection, analysis, and forensic examination. The role of law enforcement officials as a first responder will also be discussed as well as the duties of police officers. Students will also identify various careers in law enforcement. Note: Students earning an "A" or "B" are eligible to receive credit through Harford Community College under the articulation agreement. See your teacher for further information.

Prerequisite: Administration of Justice I

S.T.A.R.S. Course I and II - CT81
S.T.A.R.S. Course I - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
Grade 11

Course I will introduce students to Geographic Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) technology through academic study and applied instruction. This course is the foundation of the STARS Entry-Level GIS Technician Certification. Teachers and students will use a locally customized Geographic Information System (GIS) to learn about their local community. They will use the same data, imagery and software that NASA uses to study their state, county and school campus.



S.T.A.R.S. Course II - Skill-Based Training for Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
Grade 11

Course II will help the student learn the skills required to work on and/or build a Geographic Information Systems/Remote Sensing project. Students and teachers will follow a course of hands-on instruction to learn skills ranging from introductory digital mapping to image analysis. In this second course on the path to STARS Entry-Level GIS Technician Certification, students are introduced to each skill with a real world application and led in the problem solving process. Follow-up applied practice application will direct the student to apply acquired skills to cases in the local community using the supplied data. This repetition will set the stage for further student driven projects.

Prerequisite: Foundations of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness

S.T.A.R.S. Course III and IV - CT82
S.T.A.R.S. Course III - Advanced Skill-Based Training for Geographic Information Systems and Remote Sensing
Grade 11-12

Course III will continue to help students learn the skills required to work on and/or build a Geographic Information Systems/Remote Sensing project. Students and teachers will follow a course of hands-on instruction to learn skills ranging from introductory digital mapping to image analysis. Through Course 1 and Course 2, students learned some of the basic skills necessary to GIS. In Course 3, students will learn to apply those skills. Students will learn and apply Spatial Analyst and 3D Analyst. The ArcGIS Spatial Analyst extension allows students to examine the spatial relationships within a specific area as well as study site suitability. The ArGIS 3D Analyst extension allows students to gain a different perspective on their environment by modeling surfaces three dimensionally. Students will also learn methods of integrating external hardware in order to incorporate real time data from GPS units in order to accurately survey their community. Combined with a trouble-shooting unit and general review of skills acquired in Course 2, Course 3 can become an invaluable tool.



S.T.A.R.S. Course IV - Geospatial Application Project

Course IV is the final course in the STARS Certification series. In the beginning of this course, students will use the Project Management Model to discuss and build a campus-wide base map. Once finished with the base map, each student selects one of the campus-based projects to complete. Each of the "final" projects are designed to let the students put their Geospatial skills to use. Each student will need to complete one project and achieve a 70% or higher on the written STARS exam to become STARS certified.


Prerequisite: S.T.A.R.S. Course I and II

Internship/Capstone Experience - CT83
Grade 12

The Internship/Capstone Experience is the culminating course for the Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness Program. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to extend and apply their classroom learning in one of the career areas of Homeland Security Sciences, Criminal Justice/Law Enforcement, or Information/Communications Technology. Students will have the option of completing an industry-mentored project, internship, or enrolling in a post-secondary course. They will play an integral part in determining which type of experience will be most beneficial and supportive of their individual goals. At the end of the course, students will compile a working portfolio which documents their academic and technical skill attainment and present it for critique. Subject to administrative approval, students will enroll in approved post-secondary courses in lieu of completing a project or internship. Links between secondary and post-secondary institutions will be established to allow students to dual enroll in criminal justice or environmental technology-related courses, receiving both high school and college credit.

Prerequisite: S.T.A.R.S. Course III and IV or Administration of Justice II or Homeland Security Science Research Methods and Applications

North Harford High School
Career and Technology Education Program
Agriculture/Horticulture

The Natural Resources and Agricultural Sciences (NRAS) Program at North Harford High School is designed to provide students with essential knowledge, unique experiences, and STEM based opportunities for the purpose of pursuing academic, vocational, and recreational futures in the areas of natural resources and agricultural sciences.

The NRAS is composed of three strands of academic study: Large Animal Science, Plant Science and Natural Resources. Each strand has a four course sequence designed in conjunction with the University of Maryland in an effort to provide the core knowledge needed for students to become future leaders, business owners, and advocates, to support the growth of Maryland industries related to natural resources and agriculture.

Program Title: Agriculture/Animal Science Required Courses (Choose at least 4):
Agriculture I: Introduction to Current AG Issues - CT04
Grades: 9-12

This is a basic course in contemporary agricultural science topics, an overview of the applications of current and emerging technologies in animal, plant, food, fiber mechanical and environmental sciences, as well as natural resources management. Timely industry issues will be examined with local, regional, national and global perspectives. Biotechnology, agro terrorism, biofuels, land use, legislation, and alternative agricultural enterprise opportunities are examples of topics to be examined, as well as more traditional agricultural production in the form of individual and group activities. Career exploration, FFA and business management fundamentals will prepare students for continued agriscience studies.

Prerequisite: None

Agriculture II: AG Mechanics - CT05
Grades: 11-12

Students will be introduced to basic farm and shop tools and equipment. Skills, safe operation, maintenance and repairs are stressed. Topics include basic electricity, small engines, plumbing, masonry, construction and welding. Instruction includes limited hands-on opportunities in the laboratory and on the school farm. Individual and group work is common.

Prerequisite: Foundations of Technology

Agriculture III: Agribusiness Management - CT06
Grades: 11-12

Students will cover fundamentals of agribusiness practices including basic accounting principles, business management skills and market research. Students will develop business plans and build entrepreneurial skills through various group and individual projects. School based entrepreneurial projects are available.

Prerequisite: one of the following: Agriculture II, Animal Science II or III

Animal Science I - CT15
Grades: 10-12

Students enrolled in this introductory course will study basic principles of animal science and related agribusinesses. Topics include exploration of careers and current events, and the production, reproduction, nutrition and health management of animal species with focus on dairy and beef cattle, swine, sheep, goats and equine. Students will receive opportunities for various hands-on activities with a number of large animal species on the small-scale school farm as both individual and group opportunities.

Prerequisite: None

Animal Science II - CT16
Grades: 11-12

Students will continue the study of principles of animal science concentrating on companion animals and the veterinary health field. Small animal care, assistance and management will be continuing topic areas. Students will be given many hands-on opportunities to handle companion animals during class labs. Veterinary topics include anatomy and physiology, pharmacology, clinical assistance in patient history, vital signs, vaccinations, bandaging, surgery, veterinary office practices and medical terminology. Students successful in this course should be prepared to seek entry level employment at a companion animal care facility.

Prerequisite: Animal Science I

Animal Science III - CT17
Grades: 11-12

Students will continue their animal science studies focusing on the intricacies of equine science and management. Topics include more in-depth studies of equine breeds, anatomy and physiology, selection, uses, reproduction, nutrition and health. Specifically associated agribusinesses and the economic importance of the equine industries on the local, state, regional, national and global levels will be covered in individual and group activities. Hands-on activities will be available on the small-scale school farm.

Prerequisite: Animal Science II