Home - Harford County Public Schools

Office of Library/Media

Library media instruction is an essential part of students K-12 educational experience. All curricular areas are supported by library media services. The rapid change in communication technology requires quality library media programs with a wide variety of resources which enable students to access, evaluate, interpret, and apply information from print and nonprint materials. In an effective program, students' experiences with information move away from learning traditional library media location skills taught in isolation. Students learn information literacy skills that are embedded into the curriculum.

Elementary students are taught how to use the library media center and the many types of materials housed there. In addition, basic research elements are introduced at this level.

At the middle school level, the library media curriculum builds upon the skills and concepts taught in the elementary library media centers. Various electronic sources, online databases, general and specialized reference books, and specific organizational tools are introduced. Units of instruction are designed so that students become independent users of media center materials. Cross-curricular units require an integration of accession, location, and retrieval skills with specific research problems in content areas, and students independently compile and analyze materials on specific topics. Students are encouraged to develop the positive attitudes necessary to become life-long readers by choosing reading to gain information and by choosing literature to meet recreational needs.

At the high school level, library media curriculum is an extension of the skills and concepts learned in the elementary and middle school media programs. Students refine their use of accession, location, and retrieval skills while researching specific topics assigned by their content area teachers. Fully integrated concepts are designed to create independent learners who can thrive in an information-based society and who will enter adulthood with the abilities to fulfill their personal and professional needs.

How do I contact the Office of Library/Media?
Office of Library/Media:
Supervisor of Library Services:

Library Media Center

HCPS provide every student access to a functional, well-equipped information center that supports the goals outlined in Schools of Success, Maryland's school improvement program.

School library media programs are recognized as integral to student achievement because they provide all students and staff members with equal and timely access to ideas and information. Through an integrated instructional program, school library media specialists ensure that their students are effective users of ideas and information.

Harford County Public Schools has a student population of 41,000 students in 50 schools. Each of the schools has a library media center staffed by a professionally certified library media specialist. There are three, two building elementary schools, and each has a media center and a professionally certified library media specialist. There are :

  • 33 Elementary Schools (K-5)
  • 9 Middle Schools (6-8)
  • 10 High Schools (9-12)
  • 2 Special School



About Us

  • School Library Media Programs

    When conditions are optimal, the school library media program should exhibit the following characteristics

    • All areas of the curricula supported with a relevant, quality collection, an adequate budget, and the implementation of a current collection development plan;
    • Access on a regular basis to resource services in support of the Maryland Student Learning Outcomes and the Highs School Core Learning Goal;
    • Services of full-time certified library media specialist and support staff;
    • A program of information literacy skills instruction integrated with the total school curriculum;
    • Schools for Success supported in the library media program as a component of the school improvement plan
    • Flexibly scheduled student and teacher use of the library media center to promote authentic learning experiences; and
    • Technology incorporated into the delivery of the library media program and facilitated school wide.
  • Student Learning Outcomes

    Students must be able to achieve learning outcomes that will proovide them with the skills to become information literate, independent learner and socially responsible. These outcoems are consistent wiht both state and national goals and are identified in the newly revised Information Power by AASL and AECT and in Learning Outcomes for Library Media Skills published by the Maryland State Department of Education

    The student who is information literate:

    • Accessses information efficiently and effectively;
    • Evaluates information critically and competently; and
    • Strives for excellence in information seeking and knowledge generation.

    The student who is an independent learner is information literate and:

    • Pursues information related to personal interests;
    • Appreciates and enjoys literature and other creative expressions of information; and
    • Strives for excellence in information seeking and knowledge generation.

    The student who is socially responsible contributes positively to the learning community and to society, is information literate, and:

    • Recognizes the importance of information to a democratic society;
    • Practices ethical behavior in regard to information and information technology; and
    • Participates effectively in groups ot pursure and generate information.
  • Professional Library

    The Professional Library provides materials pertaining to education for use by employees of the school system. It contains a variety of resources selected to meet reference and research inquiries on curriculum, instruction, learning theory, the disciplines addressed in public schools, developmental stages of youth, and other related areas of study.

    The hours of operation for the school system's Professional Library are Monday-Thursday 9:00 AM until 4:00 PM when school is in session.

    The Professional Library is located at the Center for Educational Opportunity 253 Paradise Road Aberdeen, MD 21001 410-273-5583.

  • Instructional Television

    School library media specialists frequently serve as ITV coordinators for their schools. The coordinators are ultimately responsible for updating guides and disseminating information, especially that relating to the copyright laws, distributed by the Supervisor of Library Services. Although it is a common practice to assign the technician many of the administrative duties involved in the instructional television process, the school library media specialist and the principal assume the final responsibility.

    Each school media specialist should develop a procedure to assure that all video materials comply with the Harford County Public Schools' interpretations of the copyright laws.

  • Support Facilites

    The Central Video/DVD Library is located in the Forest Hill Annex and has a collection of 2,500 video tapes and more than 1,000 other items that are sent to schools on a daily basis to support the curiculum.

    The Book Processing Center is also located in the Forest Hill Annex. This center receives all new elementary books and audio visual material. It is cataloged, processed, and then sent to each school shelf ready.

  • Automation

    The Harford County Public Schools Media Centers are all automated and use the Alexandria OPAC (Online Public Access Catalog) and Circulation systems. All centeres also have access to the internet.



Curricula

  • Student Learning Outcomes

    Students must be able to achieve learning out comes that wil provide them with the skills to become information literate, independent learners and scoially responsible. These outcomes are consistent with both state and national goals and are identified in the newly revised Information Power by AASL and AECT and in Learning Outcomes for Library Media Skills published by the Maryland State Department of Education.

    The student who is information literate:

    • accesses information efficiently and effectively;
    • evaluates information critically and competently; and
    • uses information effectively and creatively.

    The student who is an independent learner is information literate and:

    • pursues information related to personal interests
    • appreciates and enjoys literature and otehr creative expressions of information; and
    • strives for excellence in information seeking and knowledge generation.

    The student who is socially responsible contributes positively to the learning community and to society, is information literate, and:

    • recognizes the importance of information to a democratic society;
    • practices ehtical behavior in regard to information and information technology; and
    • participates effectively in groups to pursue and generate information.

  • Elementary School

    Library media instruction is an essential part of the education of elementary school students in the Harford County Public Schools. All curricular areas are dependent upon library media services for the support necessary to meet many outcomes in the various disciplines. In addition, the rapid change in communication technology requires quality library media programs with a variety of resources and skills, enabling students to access, evaluate, interpret, and apply information from print and non-print materials.

    The Elementary School Library Media Curriculum Guide   provides elementary school library media specialists with a sequential program of library media standards, concepts, indicators, activities, and assessments for students in grades one through five. Elementary school administrators, library media specialists and classroom teachers are encouraged to become knowledgeable of the standards and concepts which are identified for the elementary school library media program. Elementary library media specialists and classroom teachers are strongly encouraged to plan together for cross-curricular integration. This curriculum guide will serve as an effective and useful tool to direct library media teaching and student learning.

    elementary library

    ______________________

    Sean W. Bulson, Ed.D.
    Superintendent of Schools

    Acknowldegements

    Work to create an updated school library media curriculum guide for Kindergarten through grade five was initiated in April 2008. Appreciation is expressed to the many educators in the Harford County Public Schools who contributed to the development of this guide.

    Special recognition is given to the members of the Elementary School Library Media Curriculum Committee. Curriculum development is very labor-intensive. The time and talent which was expended has resulted in a teaching resource of exceptional quality.

    Committee Members
    Mary Jo Trichtinger Prospect Mill Elementary School
    Melissa Friedman William S. James Elementary School
    Megan Erb North Harford Elementary School
    Erica Miller Homestead/Wakefield Elementary School
    Kim Powers William Paca/Old Post Road Elementary School
    Laura Coyne Forest Lakes Elementary School
    Debbie Gibbons Riverside Elementary School
    Peg Wilson Hickory Elementary School
    Diane Thompson Dublin Elementary School
    Erik Snyder Aberdeen High School
    Andrew Robertson Homestead/Wakefield Elementary School
    Heather Stiffler Meadowvale Elementary School

    Additional thanks go to those Media Specialists who assisted in the proofreading and edits to the guide.

    Committee members wish to extend their thanks to Patricia O’Donnell, Supervisor of Library Services. Without her continued interest and expertise, this guide could not have been completed.

  • Middle School

    Library Media instruction is an essential part of the education of middle school students in the Harford County Public Schools. All curricular areas are dependent upon library media services for the support necessary to meet many outcomes in the various disciplines. In addition, the rapid changes in communication technology requires quality library media programs with a variety of resources and skills, enabling students to access, evaluate, interpret, and apply information from print and non-print materials.

    The School Library Media Curriculum Guide   for Grades 6 – 8 provides middle school library media specialists with a sequential program of library media standards, concepts, indicators, activities, and assessments for students. Middle school administrators, library media specialists, and classroom teachers are encouraged to become knowledgeable of the standards and concepts which are identified for the middle school library media program and which support cross-curricular integration. This curriculum guide will serve as an effective and useful tool to direct library media teaching and student learning.

    middle school library

    ______________________

    Sean W. Bulson, Ed.D.
    Superintendent of Schools

    Acknowledgements

    Work to create an updated school library media curriculum guide for grades six through eight was initiated in April 2008. Appreciation is expressed to the many educators in the Harford County Public Schools who contributed to the development of this guide.

    Special recognition is given to the members of the Middle School Library Media Curriculum Committee. Curriculum development is very labor-intensive. The time and talent, which was expended, has resulted in a teaching resource of exceptional quality.


    Committee Members

    Terri Plumer Fallston Middle School
    Melissa Haley-Driver Magnolia Middle School
    Joanne Slagle Patterson Mill Middle School
    Jo Tyson North Harford Middle School

    Committee members wish to extend their thanks to Patricia O’Donnell, Supervisor of Library Services. Without her continued interest and expertise, this guide could not have been completed.

  • High School

    Library Media instruction is an essential part of the education of high school students in the Harford County Public Schools. All curricular areas are dependent upon library media services for the support necessary to meet many outcomes in the various disciplines. In addition, the rapid change in communication technology requires quality library media programs with a variety of resources and skills, enabling students to access, evaluate, interpret, and apply information from print and non-print materials.

    The High School Library Media Curriculum Guide   provides high school library media specialists with a sequential program of library media standards, concepts, indicators, activities, and assessments for students in grades nine through twelve. High school administrators, library media specialists, and classroom teachers are encouraged to become knowledgeable of the standards and concepts which are identified for the middle school library media program and which support cross-curricular integration. This curriculum guide will serve as an effective and useful tool to direct library media teaching and student learning.

    high school library


    ______________________

    Sean W. Bulson, Ed.D.
    Superintendent of Schools

    Acknowledgements

    Work to create an updated school library media curriculum guide for grades nine through twelve was initiated in April 2008. Appreciation is expressed to the many educators in the Harford County Public Schools who contributed to the development of this Guide.

    Special recognition is given to the members of the High School Library Media Curriculum Committee. Curriculum development is very labor-intensive. The time and talent, which was expended, has resulted in a teaching resource of exceptional quality.

    Committee Members:

    Dawn Hetzer Bel Air High School
    Alyssa King C. Milton Wright High School
    Cass Mairs Fallston High School
    Karen Dietz Edgewood High School
    Sarah Johnson Patterson Mill Middle-High School
    Robert Ott North Harford High School

    Committee members wish to extend their thanks to Patty O’Donnell, Supervisor of Library Services. Without her continued interest and expertise, this Guide could not have been completed.



Materials Selection Policy

  • Elementary Selection Policy for Media Materials

    The school accepts the responsibility to provide materials for its students as stated in the School Library Bill of Rights.

    1. Responsibility for selection of materials
      1. Materials are selected by the school library media specialist with the approval of the principal and the Supervisor of Library Services.
      2. Selection is based on the careful study of reviews from reliable sources, and, when possible, on personal inspection of the materials.
    2. Criteria for media selection
      1. Materials are selected which contribute directly or indirectly to the school curriculum.
      2. Each item is evaluated for its particular contributions to the collection.
      3. The wide range of pupil reading abilities, maturity levels, and interests are considered.
      4. Recreational and developmental needs of pupils are represented as often as possible.
      5. Nonfiction books must be functional, appropriate, accurate, and objective.
      6. It is important that there be a balance of opposing ideas represented in the collection.
      7. Fiction books must have two positive reviews which include age appropriateness of materials.
      8. The form of medium must be appropriate to the information it carries.
      9. The technical qualities of the medium should include clear sound and/or image and an aesthetically pleasing format.
      10. Material which may be offensive to some are evaluated in the light of their overall contributions. Honesty of presentation, literary value, and a realistic manner of portraying life are considered in determining their right to a place in the collection.
      11. Gift items must meet the same standards as those of items purchased before being added to the collection.
      12. The collection is constantly under reevaluation. Materials which no longer meet the needs of the pupils are discarded. The decision to replace lost, damaged or worn materials is based on the availability of newer or better materials and the continuing need for the materials in question.
      13. Challenged materials will be evaluated by a committee of teachers and administrators selected by the principal. Reevaluation is based on the county's selection policy.
  • Middle/High Selection Policy for Media Materials

    The school library media center has a vital place in the total educational program. The school library media center exists to provide materials, equipment and services for the students and faculty it serves. Selection of various materials, therefore, becomes an important, responsible task as stated in the School Library Bill of Rights for School Library Media Center Programs which the school upholds:

    The American Association of School Librarians reaffirms its belief in the Library Bill of Rights of the American Library Association. Media personnel are concerned with generating an understanding of American freedoms through the development of informed and responsible citizens. To this end, the American Association of School Librarians asserts that the responsibility of the school library media center is:

    To provide a comprehensive collection of instructional materials selected in compliance with basic written selection principles, and to provide maximum accessibility to these materials.

    To provide materials that will support the curriculum, taking into consideration the individual's needs and the varied interests, abilities, social-economic back-grounds, and maturity levels of the students served.

    To provide materials for teachers and students that will encourage growth in knowledge and that will develop literary, cultural and aesthetic appreciation and ethical standards.

    To provide materials which reflect the ideas and beliefs of religious, social, political, historical and ethnic groups and their contribution to the American and world heritage and culture, thereby, enabling students to develop an intellectual integrity in forming judgments.

    To provide a written statement, approved by the local Board of Education, of the procedures for meeting the challenge of censorship of materials in school library media centers.

    To provide qualified professional personnel to serve teachers and students. The school library media center houses a collection of materials including books, newspaper, periodicals, filmstrips, slides, records, microfiche, tapes, computer software and media kits that support and enrich the school's curriculum. In addition, to supporting the ever-changing needs of the curriculum, the school library media center staff recognizes the need to enhance and to effectualize each student's recreational, developments, and extra-curricular interests and needs, as well. Thus, materials are also selected based on the growth...physical, mental, emotional and intellectual...of the individual child, encompassing his wide range of reading abilities, interests, and maturity levels.

  • Selection Criteria

    Each item whether print or non-print is carefully evaluated within the framework of sound selection principles, using reliable reviewing sources and personal inspection of the materials whenever possible. The following standard selection tools are utilized:

    • Booklist
    • Hornbook
    • Bulletin for the Center of Children's Books
    • School Library Journal
    • Internet Review Sources, Such as Follett, Bound to Stay Bound, Barnes and Noble, Amazon, Etc.

    Responsibility for Selection

    The school library media specialists believe that selection is a continuous and cooperative process involving all professional members of the school staff teachers, school library media specialist-subject to the approval of the Supervisor of Library Services and the school principal.

    General Criteria for Media Selection

    The following are general guidelines used to evaluate the materials considered for inclusion into the media center's collection:

    • The school library media center materials should be pertinent to the curriculum and contribute to the instructional objectives of the school's educational program.
    • Materials should be relevant to today's world and represent artistic, historic and literary qualities.
    • Nonfiction materials must give functional, appropriate, accurate and objective information.
    • Fiction books must have positive qualities of plot, style, characterization and theme.
    • All school library media center materials are related in content and vocabulary to the diverse high school student and geared to satisfy his informational, recreational and cultural needs.
    • Materials should lead to the development of responsible citizens.
    • Materials should reflect the problems, aspirations, attitudes and ideals of society.
    • Nonprint materials should be of good technical quality; have clear narration and images; synchronized sound and an aesthetically pleasing format appropriate to the information conveyed.
    • Materials are purchased from recommendations in reviews and standard lists.
    • Materials may be purchased from student, faculty or community recommendations.
    • The school library media center shall have materials on hand that represent differing viewpoints on controversial subjects for information and research purposes.
    • Materials sometimes considered unsuitable for adolescents may be denied a place in our collection. Specifically, materials of poor literary quality or unnecessary nudity, violence, vulgarity, profanity, or those extreme in academic utility and expense are felt to be unnecessary in our collection. The fact of sexual incidents or profanity appearing does not automatically disqualify media materials. Rather, the decision is made on the basis of whether the material presents life in its true proportions, whether the material is of literary value and whether circumstances are dealt with realistically.

    Gifts

    Items, whether print or non-print, which are presented as gifts to the school library media center must meet the same standards as those materials purchased before the gift item will be added to the collection.

  • Library Bill of Rights

    The American Library Association affirms that all libraries are forums for information and ideas, and that the following basic policies should guide their services.

    1. Books and other library resources should be provided for the interest, information, and enlightenment of all people of the community the library serves. Materials should not be excluded because of the origin, background,or views of those contributing to their creation.
    2. Libraries should provide materials and information presenting all points of view on current and historical issues. Materials should not be proscribed or removed because of partisan or doctrinal disapproval.
    3. Libraries should challenge censorship in the fulfillment of their responsibility to provide information and enlightenment.
    4. Libraries should cooperate with all persons and groups concerned with resisting abridgment of free expression and free access to ideas.
    5. A person's right to use a library should not be denied or abridged because of origin, age, background, or views.
    6. Libraries which make exhibit spaces and meeting rooms available to the public they serve should make such facilities available on an equitable basis, regardless of the beliefs or affiliations of individuals or groups requesting their use.

    Adopted June 18, 1948. Amended February 2, 1961, and January 23, 1980, by the ALA Council


Online Resources and Support

  • Standard Databases - Elementary Schools*
    • Alexandria
    • America the Beautiful
    • C.E.R.F.
    • Culture Grams
    • Discovery Education (Basic Package)
    • New Book of Knowledge
    • SIRS Package
    • Wilson Educational Index (Educational Resouce for Teachers)
    • World Book Encyclopedia

    *Ask the Media Specialists how to access these from school or home
  • Standard Databases - Middle/High Schools*
    • Alexandria
    • Americana (High Only)
    • Bridges (Careers)
    • Culture Grams
    • Discovery Education (Basic Package)
    • Gale Opposing Viewpoints
    • Gale Resources Center Gold
    • Gale Science
    • Gale Testing & Educational Reference Center
    • Grolier Multimedia (Middle Only)
    • Lands and People
    • Maps 101
    • Miti Net (MARC Wizard)
    • New Book of Knowledge (Middle Only)
    • Reference Suite @ Facts.com
    • SIRS Package
    • Wilson Educational Index
    • Wilson Educationa Index (Educational Resource for Teachers)

    *Ask the Media Specialists how to access these from school or home
  • MLA Style Bibliography
    Works Cited/Bibliographic Format for References (2009)
    MLA Style Guide
    (based on the MLA Handbook for Writers of Reseach Papers, 7th ed., 2009)

    In MLA (Modern Language Association) style, sources are acknowledged by short parenthetical citations in the text instead of numbered footnotes. The parenthetical citation includes just enough information to point the reader to the complete information about the source in the Works Cited list. The parenthetical usually includes the author's last name (use the first one or two main words from the title if an anonymous work), and the page number cited. Leave the author's name out of the parenthetical if it is clearly stated in your sentence. When your Works Cited list includes more than one work by an author, the parenthetical should include part of the title, i.e., (Hudson, West Nile 125). If the entire work is being acknowledged, or there is no page or paragraph number (as in the case of online works), incorporate the author's name into the sentence instead of using a parenthetical.


    Fiction or Nonfiction Books

    Type of Entry

    Bibliography / Works Cited List

    Citation in Text

    1.

    Book – one author

    Last Name, First Name. Book Title. Place of Publication:
    Publisher, copyright date. Print.

    Smith, Joan. Famous Women. Chicago: Wilson and Company,
    1992. Print.

    (Smith 170)

    Smith has argued…(170)

    2.

    Book – more than one author

    Last, First, First and Last, and First and Last. Book Title. Place of
    Publication: Publisher, copyright date. Print.

    Jones, Richard, Carl Smith, and John Dow. Running Wild. New
    York: Random House, 1995. Print.

    (Jones, Smith, and Dow 9)

    3.

    Essays, poems, short stories in an anthology
    (collection of works/articles)

    Original author of work. “Title of Work.” Title of Book. Editor of book.
    Place of Publication: Publisher, Copyright date. Pages article is found. Print.

    Peploe, James. “Poe’s Ultimate Downfall.” Gothic Tales.  Ed.
    John Smith. New York: McGraw Hill, 1998. 39-52. Print.

     (Poe 45)

    Poe’s main character, Roderick Usher, mentions “phantasmagoric conceptions” (Peploe 45)... 

    4.

    Book – author with an editor

    Last, First. Book Title. Editor. Place of Publication: Publisher, copyright
    date. Print.

    Dickinson, Emily. Great Poems of Emily Dickinson. Ed. ;Henry
    Smith. Boston: Houghton, 1974. Print.

    (Dickinson 25)

    5.

    Book – edited

    Title. Editor. Place of Publication: Publisher, copyright date.Print.

    Medieval Civilization . Smith, Sue and Mary Jones, eds.  Oxford:
    Clarendon Press, 1972. Print.

    ( Medieval 175)

    6.

    Bible

    Title of Bible .  Place of Publication: Publisher, copyright date.Print.

    Holy Bible King James Version .  New York:  Catholic Review,
    1969. Print.

    First reference
    (King James Version, Gen. 3.15)

    Subsequent references
    (2 Cor. 5.17)


    Reference Books

    Type of Entry

    Bibliography / Works Cited List

    Citation in Text

    7.
    Article – unsigned in a reference book (most are multi-volume sets)

    Look to see if an author is scripted before or after the subject article. If no author is to be found:

    “Article/Heading title.”
    Reference book title. Editor. Volume. Place of publication: Publisher, copyright date. Print.

     “Vietnam.”  The Sixties in America
    Ed. Owen Edwards. Vol. 1.  New York: Salem Press, 1999. Print.

    (“Vietnam” 192)

    8.
    Article – signed in a reference book (most are multi-volume sets)

    If an author is scripted before or after the subject article:

    Author last name, first name. “Article/Heading title.”
    Reference book title. Editor. Volume. Place of publication: Publisher, copyright date. Print.

    Luft, Herbert. “Berlin Wall.” The Sixties in America.
    Ed. Rachel Wellek. Vol. 6. New York: Salem Press, 1999. Print.

    (Luft 5807)

    9.

    Dictionary

    “Word.”  Title of Dictionary. Edition. Copyright date. Print.

    “Verisimilitude.”  Webster’s Dictionary.  14th ed. 1996.
    Print.

    (“Verisimilitude”)
    no page number is necessary because entries are arranged alphabetically

    10.

    Reprinted article

    Decide format for original article. Is it a signed reference article, a journal article, a news article, etc.? Then use the corresponding format. Everything after the “Rpt in” Should follow the example

    Author Last Name, First Name. “Title of Original Article.” 
    Title of Original Book Volume (Year):  Pages. Rpt. In Title of Reference Book .  Editor’s Name.  Volume.  Place of Publication:  Publisher, copyright date.  Pages. Print.

    Roberts, Shelia. “ The Bell Jar: Plath’s Confined
    World.”  World Literature Review 24 (1984): 232-38. Rpt. In Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism.  Ed. Dennis Poupard.  Vol. 25.  Detroit: Gale, 1988. 399-402. Print.

    (Roberts 400)


    Periodicals

    Type of Entry

    Bibliography / Works Cited List

    Citation in Text

    11.

    Journal article
    (regardless of type of pagination)

    Last, First. “Title of Article.”  Title of Journal Volume
    number. Issue (Year): page numbers. Print.

    Carter, John. “Motors in Our World.” Science News 51
    (1984): 499-506. Print.

    (Carter 500)

    12.

    Magazine article (signed)

    Last, First. “Title of Article.”  Title of Magazine day month
    year: page numbers. Print.

    Pikar, Avil. “Why Homework Can Hurt.” Newsweek 23
    Dec. 1991: 70-71. Print.

    (Pikar 70)

    13.
     
    Newspaper article (unsigned)

    “Title of Article.” Title of Newspaper day month year: page.
    Print.
    [If the newspaper is a certain edition, morning or late, etc., add a comma after the date and place the edition. Follow the edition, or the date if there is no edition, with a colon and the page number(s)]

    “Give Baltimore More Hope.” The Baltimore Sun. 18
    Dec. 1994: G6. Print.

    (“Give” G6)


    Miscellaneous


    Type of Entry

    Bibliography / Works Cited List

    Citation in Text

    14.

    Interview

    Wiesel, Elie. Interview with Ted Koppel. Nightline.
    ABC. WABC, New York. 18 Apr. 2002. DVD.

    Ekey, William. Personal Interview. 12 January 2007.

    Mention in your text

    According to Mr. Ekey…

    15.

    Cartoon

    Trudeau, Garry. "Doonesbury." Comic Strip. The
    Baltimore Sun 4 May 2002: 26. Print.

    Mention in your text

    Trudeau’s humor in “Doonesbury”…

    16.

    Map (non-digital)

    Michigan . Map. Chicago: Rand, 2000. Print.

    Mention in your text

    Michigan shows Brown Lake…”

    17.

    Art work
    (painting, photograph, sculpture, etc.)

    Original Bearden, Romare. The Train. Carole and Alex

    Rosenberg Collection, New York.

    Photograph of work (indicate complete pub. info for the source in which photo appears, including page)

    El Greco. Burial of Count Orgaz. San Tomé, Toledo.
    Resaissance Perspectives in Literature and Visual Arts. By Murray Roston. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1987. 192. Print.

    Mention in your text

    The mystery of Bearden’s The Train

    18.

    Film or video

    Title of film. Screenplay writer. Director. Main actors.
    Distributed by, year released.

    Jaws. Screenplay by Peter Benchley. Dir. Steven
    Spielberg. Perf. Roy Scheider, Robert Shaw, Richard Dreyfuss. Universal Pictures, 1975. Film.

    Mention in your text

    The horror in Jaws


    Digital Sources

    Check online databases and other web services for “How to Cite” or Bibliography links. These links give you the actual citation or up to date steps and examples for MLA and APA formats.


    Type of Entry

    Bibliography / Works Cited List

    Citation in Text
    (no page numbers used for digital sources)

    19.

    Article from an online database

    When citing an online source, include the pub’tn date (1999) and the date you visited the site (25 Feb. 2004).

     

    Follow guidelines given to you by the database

     

    Mention in your text:

    Plath wrote...(“Sylvia”)

    According to Frick...

    20.
    Newspaper article from online database

    When citing an online source, include pub. date (5 June 1998) and date you visited the site (25 Sept. 2003).

    Follow guidelines given to you by the database

    Mention in your text:

    Fletcher reports...

    21.
    Article/Work from a Web site

    Author/editor. "Title of Article." Web Site. last updated
    copyright. Publisher or sponsor or the site or N.p. if none given. Date of publication or n.d. if none given. Type/medium of publication (Web). Date of access (day, month, and year).

    Baish, Vanessa. "Self-Image." Teen Health and
    Wellness: Real Life, Real Answers. 2007. Rosen Publishing Group, Inc. n.d. Web. 19 Dec. 2007.

    Mention in your text:

    Baish states...

    22.
    Entire Web site

    When citing an online source, include the pub. date (2003) and the date you visited the site (25 Sept. 2003).

    Electronic Poetry Center . 2003. State University of
    New York Buffalo. 25 Sept. 2003 <http://epc.buffalo.edu>.

    Mention in your text:

    The Electronic Poetry Center archives...

    23.

    CD-Rom

    Author’s Last, First. “Title of Article.” CD-ROM Source
    Publisher of CD-ROM Source: Place of publication, Copyright date. CD-ROM.

    Aristotle. The Complete Works of Aristotle: The
    Revised Oxford Translation. Ed. Jonathan Barnes. 2 vols. Princeton: Princeton UP, 1984. CD-ROM.

    Mention in your text:

    Aristotle wrote…

    24.

    Online government document

    Agency. Title of Source. Date of pub.(day, month, year).
    Medium of source. Date of access (day, month, year).

    Center for Disease Control.   Fighting AIDS.  1984.
    Web. 15 December 1998. 

    Mention in your text:

    According to the Center for Disease Control ...

    25.

    Online graphics

    “Title of graphic.” Graphic type. Copyright holder. Name of
    site providing graphic. Date of access (day, month, year)

    “Afganistan.” Map. Magellan Geographix. SIRS
    Knowledge Source. Web. 25 Feb. 2004.

    Mention in your text:

    “Afganistan” shows that the country’s population…


    Sample Works Cited Page

    Alvarez, Claire. "Inside Investigative Reporting: Nellie Bly’s Madhouse Memoir.” Newsweek. 25 Nov. 1999: 42-56.
    Print.

    American Experience: Around the World in 72 Days. 1999. PBS Online. Web. 10 October 2006.

    Elbert, Monica M. “1850-1910.” Women Who Changed America. Ed. Robert Davis. Philadelphia: Chelsea House,
    2004. 181-202. Print.

    Kroeger, Brooke. Nellie Bly. New York: Random House, 1994. Print.

    "Nellie Bly." Great Lives from History. Ed. Larissa Juliet Taylor. Vol. 1. California: Salem Press, 2006. Print.

  • Copyright Policies

    Policy Statement

    Employees shall comply with copyright laws and guidelines for use of print, multimedia, and computer software as set forth in the Administrative Guidelines and Procedures. Failure to comply shall result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.

    Students shall comply with copyright laws and guidelines for use of print, multimedia, and computer software as set forth in the Administrative Guidelines and Procedures. Students who fail to comply shall be disciplined according to the procedures set forth in the Harford County Public School System's Parent/Student Handbook.

    Students or employees shall obtain permission using the Copyright Permission Request form prior to publishing or reproducing more than fair use guidelines permit. When the copyright of a work is in doubt (as on the Internet), the employee or student shall assume it is copyrighted information and shall proceed accordingly.

    The Superintendent shall be responsible for ensuring that administrative procedures for copyright policy are effectively implemented throughout the system.

    Legal References

    17 United States Code 101 et seq.

    Policy Adopted: 9/11/2000

    _______________________________________________________
    Jacqueline C. Hass,
    Secretary and Treasurer Board of Education of Harford County





    Copyright Policy

    Employees shall comply with copyright laws and guidelines for use of print, multimedia, and computer software as set forth in the Administrative Guidelines and Procedures. Failure to comply shall result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.

    Students shall comply with copyright laws and guidelines for use of print, multimedia, and computer software as set forth in the Administrative Guidelines and Procedures. Students who fail to comply shall be disciplined according to the procedures set forth in the Harford County Public School System's Parent/Student Handbook.

    Students or employees shall obtain permission using the Copyright Permission Request form prior to publishing or reproducing more than fair use guidelines permit. When the copyright of a work is in doubt (as on the Internet), the employee or student shall assume it is copyrighted information and shall proceed accordingly.

    The Superintendent shall be responsible for ensuring that administrative procedures for copyright policy are effectively implemented throughout the system.


    Procedures

    The Human Resources Department will provide all current and new employees with a copy of the copyright policy and the accompanying procedures. All employees will be expected to abide by the policy and procedures.

    Copyright

    The purpose of copyright is to provide the author of an artistic, literary, musical, or dramatic work the rewards of his/her efforts. It is a legal tool whereby the author may grant (or not) permission to distribute, modify, perform, copy, display, or otherwise use the intellectual property.

    While ideas cannot be copyrighted, the following are categories of work which can receive a copyright:

    • Literary Works
    • Musical Works, Including Accompanying Words
    • Dramatic Works, Including Accompanying Music
    • Pantomimes and Choreographic Works
    • Pictorial, Graphic and Sculptural Works
    • Motion Pictures and Other Audio Visual Works
    • Sound Recordings
    • Architectural Works

    Public educational institutions have been granted exemptions to the copyright law in specific instances: face-to-face teaching, educational broadcasting, and non-standard performances. An owner's copyright is NOT infringed when, in an educational institution, an instructor or pupil reads, displays, or performs a copyrighted work in a classroom or similar place devoted to instruction. The activity must take place "face-to-face." Limited exemptions apply to instructional broadcasting and non-profit performances of copyrighted material.

    Educational institutions are also granted limited use of copyrighted material through fair use guidelines. These guidelines are explained in the following pages.

    Fair Use Guidelines for Printed Material and Music

    At some point all educators are likely to be faced with an event or activity that bears directly on The Copyright Act of 1976. The purpose and conditions for the use of copyrighted materials are defined clearly under the law. Although producers have specific rights, which cannot be denied, fair use guidelines allow educators and students to have access to certain material for limited educational purposes. An understanding of the concept of fair use of copyrighted material is a key factor in determining what may or may not be copied. Section 107 of the copyright law states that:

    …the fair use of a copyrighted work, including such use by reproduction in copies or phonorecords or by any other means specified by that section (Sec.106) for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, (including multiple copies for classroom use) scholarship, or research is not an infringement of copyright.

    Furthermore, section 107 lists the following criteria for evauluating the fair use of copyrighted materials in an educational setting:

    • The purpose and character of the use, including whether such use is of a commercial nature or is for nonprofit educational pruposes;
    • The nature of the copyrighted work;
    • The amount and substantiality of the portion used in relation of the copyrighted work as a whole;
    • The effect of the use upon the potential market for or value of the copyrighted work.

    This chart contains the current consensus on the extent of fair use. The more one exceeds these guidelines, the greater the chance of violating copyright laws.

    Genre
    Individual copies for
    research or preparation
    Multiple copies for
    classroom use
    Poetry One poem 250-word excerpt or complete poem less than 250 words and not more than two pages
    Prose One article, story or essay One, 2,500 word or less complete article, story or essay or a 1,000 word excerpt of a longer article not to exceed 10% of the work. No more than one complete poem, article, story or essay or two excerpts by the same author. Not more than three from the same collective work or periodical volume during one class term.
    Textbook One chapter Same as prose
    Graphic One graphic per book The graphic may not be altered in any way.
    Workbook Pages NEVER make multiple copies of a workbook page, etc., unless permission is granted. A single overhead transparency from a single page of a consumable workbook may be made.
    Music One copy of a lost part in an emergency if it is to be replaced with a new commercial copy. 10% of a musical work as long as it does not constitute a performable unit. Music may NEVER be copied to be used for a performance

    All copies should include copyright symbol, date, and publisher. The law permits nine instances of copying per course per term. The copied material is for only one course in the school.

    Fair Use Guidelines for Educational Multimedia

    The following guidelines were adopted as a nonlegislative report by the Subcommittee on courts and Intellectual Property, U S House of Representatives in 1996. While they are not legally binding, they represent the current consensus on the extent of fair use of multimedia. The more one exceeds these guidelines, the greater the chance of violating copyright laws.

    Educational Multimedia Project

    Educational multimedia projects are included in the Pre K-12 Instructional Technology Outcomes approved by the General Curriculum Committee in June 1998. Multimedia projects are defined the following way in the guidelines:

    Educational multimedia projects created under these guidelines incorporate students' or educators' original material, such as course notes on commentary, together with various copyrighted media formats including but not limited to, motion media, music, text material, graphics, illustrations, photographs and digital software which are combined into an integrated presentation.

    When multimedia projects are used for educational purposes, educators and students may include copyrighted material subject to the time, portion, copying, and distribution limitations. Educators in the Harford County Public Schools System are defined as teachers, administrators, and others who engage in scholarly, research, or instructional activities for educational institutions.

    Student Use

    Students may prepare, perform, and display multimedia projects with limited copyrighted material.

    Educators

    Students may prepare, perform, and display multimedia projects with limited copyrighted material for the following uses:

    • Face-to-face instruction
    • Assignments to students for self-directed study
    • Remote instruction if the institutions can prevent duplication
    • Peer conferences and workshops

    Limitations on use of copyrighted material in one multipedia project.

    Time

    Educators--up to two years
    Students may retain a copy for portfolio of academic work or for personal use in job interviews.
    Copying and Distribution Educators may retain no more than two copies, one on reserve for students and one to archive for professional portfolio. An additional copy may be made to replace a lost or damaged copy. Students' work may not be copied or distributed without permission.
    Portion For educator or student, the portion limits apply to an academic semester, cycle or term:
    Motion Media Up to 10% or three minutes which ever is less.
    Text Up to 10% or 1000 words, which ever is less.
    Music, Lyrics, and Music Video Up to 10% but no more than 30 seconds of individual or aggregate of works
    Illustrations and Photographs An entire photograph or illustration, but no more than five images by an artist In collective works, not more than 10% or 15 images, whichever is less.
    Numerical Data Sets Up to 10% of 2500 fields (in database) or cell entries (in spread sheet)

    Examples of when permission is required

    1. Using multimedia for non-educational or commercial purposes.
    2. Duplication of multimedia projects beyond limitations listed in guidelines.
    3. Distribution of multimedia projcts beyond limitations listed in guidelines.

    Caution on use of material from the internet in multimedia projects

    1. There is a mixture of copyrighted and public domain information on the internet.
    2. Some copyrighted works may have been placed on the internet iwthout permission.
    3. Fair use guidelines do not apply to reproducing some or parts of computer softeware.

    Multimedia on use of material from the internet in multimedia projects

    The use of any form of multimedia in the development of a website should parallel the rules for multimedia projects

    Computer software is protected by the 1976 Copyright Act as literacy work; however, fair use guidelines are impossible to apply. Software publishers issue various types of licenses for the purchase and use of their products, i.e., site licenses, lab packs, network licenses, and one license per computer.

    Unless written authorization is supplied by the publisher, students and staff are prohibited from copying software licensed from the school system.

    Personal software may not be loaded on equipment owned by the school district.

    Illegal copies of software may not be used on school equipment.


Book Awards

  • The Caldecott Award

    The Caldecott Medal was named in honor of nineteenth-century English illustrator Randolph Caldecott. It is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book made for children.

    The Newbery Medal

    The Newbery Medal was named for eighteenth-century British bookseller John Newbery. It is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.

    The Coretta Scott King Award

    The Coretta Scott King Book Awards honor African American authors and illustrators of books for children and young adults that demonstrate sensitivity to the African American experience via literature and illustration.

    Michael L. Printz

    The Michael L. Printz Award is an award for a book that exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature. It is named for a Topeka, Kansas school librarian who was a long-time active member of the Young Adult Library Services Association.

    The Black-Eyed Susan Award

    The Black-Eyed Susan Book Award is a children's choice award for the state of Maryland. Each year since 1992, the Black-Eyed Susan Book Award has been given to authors and/or illustrators of outstanding books chosen for the award by Maryland students.

    The Laura Ingalls Wilder Award

    Administered by the Association for Library Service to Children, the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award was first given to its namesake in 1954. The award, a bronze medal, honors an author or illustrator whose books, published in the United States, have made, a substantial and lasting contribution to literature for children.